Paper and Conference Calls

Past Due Conference Calls

Call for Papers
Not an Exit but a Shift: Changing Children’s Literature
MLA, Vancouver
January 5-8, 2015
Deadline: March 1, 2014

In her 1998 article “Exit Children’s Literature?” Maria Nikolajeva meditates on contemporary trends in the children’s genre and closes with the statement that “we must acknowledge that, sooner or later, children's literature will be integrated into the mainstream and disappear.” This panel responds to the question of her title, but it focuses less on the idea of a disappearance or death, and more on a reimagining of the children’s genre. In this way, we work from Nikolajeva’s earlier suggestion that we must “re-define our notion of children's literature.” With this in mind, we invite papers that address the ways turn-of-the-twenty-first-century children’s texts have shifted to accommodate and reflect a contemporary childhood through changes in aesthetics, mediums, genres, and/or ideologies.

Papers that acknowledge and detail new frameworks for understanding the genre (as opposed to using the label of “exit” or “death”) will be given special consideration. We strongly encourage papers to keep Nikolajeva’s work in mind; while it is not necessary to directly engage this piece, familiarity with her argument, and other similar arguments about the possible end of children’s literature, is a strength.

Topic suggestions include, but are not limited to:

  • Changing aesthetics in children’s pictorial art
  • Ethics of identity and a twenty-first century ideological inclusion
  • The emergence and influence of new ALA awards, such as the Pura Belpré and Stonewall Book Awards
  • Changing constructions of childhood and corresponding cultural experiences of the twenty-first century child
  • Depictions of a realistic twenty-first century and its complicated childhoods
  • Historical comparisons and contextual understandings of the child across the genre
  • The effects of new media on children’s literature and children’s culture
  • The emergence of a clearly marketed pre-adolescent “middle grade” genre and a “New Adult” genre
  • Analyses of new genre features, literary and cultural
Please submit 500-word abstracts to Ramona Caponegro (rcaponeg@emich.edu) and Abbie Ventura (abbie-ventura@utc.edu) by March 1.

This panel is sponsored by the Children’s Literature Association but is not guaranteed. The 2015 MLA conference will be held in Vancouver, January 5-8.



Call for Papers
“Enchanted Places”, Imagined Childhoods

A Symposium on Children’s Literature and Psychoanalysis
Saturday, September 20, 2014
Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania
Deadline: February 15, 2014

Featured Author:  Jerry Spinelli

Jerry Spinelli has been writing books for more than thirty years and has published an average of one book a year over that time.  Maniac Magee (1991) won the Newbery Award and Wringer (1997) was a Newbery Honor recipient.  More recent titles include Stargirl (2000), Milkweed (2003) and Hokey Pokey (2013). In a blend of gritty realism and casual magic, Spinelli locates his stories in the places where ordinary children live—old cities, dreary suburbs and school classrooms—then enchants these places with transcendent language and characters who radiate courage and bold eccentricity.  His stories confront difficult and conflictual themes like poverty, homelessness and urban race relations, as well as mourning and social ostracism, but they do so without sentimentality.  Spinelli’s characters are never victims, but are tough survivors and often moral and spiritual heroes in his and their imagined worlds.

It is a challenge to psychoanalytic theory and practice to acknowledge the “enchanting” role of language on a day to day basis as we practice our “talking cure,” as well as to go beyond our normative developmental narratives in order to account for the survivors, the exceptions, and the morally courageous characters who have emerged from difficult environmental circumstances to transform their own lives and the lives of others in the process.

This symposium will provide an opportunity for explorations of language, of ‘enchantment’ in psychoanalysis and literature; of the reciprocal acts of imagination between author and reader involved in creating works of childrens’ literature; and,  the possibilities for transformation of the painful realities of ordinary childhood in both psychoanalysis and literature.  It will provide a forum for Jerry Spinelli’s work, for the work of other authors, as well as for works of theoretical, clinical and literary interest. Academics, psychoanalysts, graduate students and psychoanalytic candidates are encouraged to submit original papers on any aspects of the above.

Guidelines for submission:
Completed papers only. 8-10 pp.  No abstracts or proposals.
Names and identifying information on separate cover sheet only.
Deadline: February 15, 2014
Send papers to:  Elaine Zickler, PhD at mezickler@gmail.com



Call for Papers
Global Literature for the Global Child:
The 2nd US-China Children’s Literature Symposium

Columbia, South Carolina
Columbia Marriott
June 22-24, 2014
Deadline: January 15, 2014

  In Peter Hunt’s International Companion Encyclopedia of Children’s Literature, Ronald Jobe writes,
   
              Never has there been a greater demand to be able to read books from
              other areas of the world; children need to read the best literature
              other countries have to offer.  We must meet this challenge by
              respecting and providing the best in translations or they will be
              cheated out of their global heritage.

Despite this claim, many excellent works of children’s literature remain unavailable to those who do not read the language in which it is written.  This second US-China Children’s Literature Symposium seeks to explore the global child and how the relative ease of communication across cultures and countries is currently impacting children’s literature around the world.  Presentations might address the following questions: How are children’s relationships with books defined in different countries and cultures? How does being able to access books from other countries in either the native language or in translation influence children’s understanding of the world around them?   What role does the translator play in determining meaning in translated children’s books?  The number of American children’s books available on the Chinese market is far greater than the Chinese books in the US.  Why does such disparity exist, and to what extent do these numbers influence the cultural competence of the children in each country? Also, what are the influences of foreign literatures upon U.S., Chinese or other children's literature? Presentations might also discuss representations of global literature/culture in U.S., Chinese or other children's literature.

  While essays may focus on any international children’s literature, several papers will be chosen that relate to Chinese or Chinese-American children’s literature and the relationship between American and Chinese children’s books.

  The necessity of on-site, consecutive translation requires the following:

  • Presenters must submit completed essays (approximately 8 pages in length) by February 5 to allow for translation prior to the conference;
  • Presenters must prepare a 10-minute “brief” of their essay to be translated during conference session. Since audience members will have read the essays ahead of time, after the “brief,” the remaining portions of each session will then be devoted to discussion.  
Abstracts of 250-300 words or 8-page essays (4000-5000 words), or panels of no more than 3 abstracts or papers should be submitted by January 15, 2014 to: http://libsci.sc.edu/us_china_symposium/index.html.

Please direct questions to Dr. Michelle H. Martin, martinmi@sc.edu, 864-508-1838.


Call for Paper Proposals
"I Will Be Myself": Identity in Children's and Young Adult  Literature, Media and Culture

A peer-reviewed graduate student conference on children’s literature
with keynote speaker Dr. Phillip Serrato
University of British Columbia
Saturday, May 3, 2014
Deadline Extended: February 1, 2014

"I Will Be Myself": Identity in Children's and Young Adult Literature, Media and Culture is a one-day conference showcasing graduate student research that explores, questions, and analyzes the issues surrounding identity in various elements of children’s and young adult literature. You are invited to submit an academic paper proposal or a creative writing submission that contributes to the existing body of literature and research in the area of children’s and young adult literature studies, which includes novels, films, apps, and picturebooks, as well as other culturally produced modes of children’s literature. We are particularly interested in research and creative pieces that draw upon broadly interpreted themes of identity, which can include liminality, hybridity, Otherness or Othering, gender, and transformation.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Identity as a critical lens for reading children’s and young adult literature
  • The child or young adult choosing or combining identities
  • Issues of hybridity: hybridity of genre, multimodality, cultural identity, racial identity, sexual identity
  • How 'otherness' shapes identity in materials for children and youth
  • Negotiation of self and Other as represented in cultural texts
  • Liminality and other states of ‘being in between’
  • Indigenous identities
  • National identities
  • Boundaries, their creation and transgression
  • Multiple, cross-cultural, and/or transnational identities
  • The role of identity in constructing literature and literacies
  • Reconstructive identity and multiple selves
  • Imagined identities: dreams, fantasy and desire
  • The cultural markers of childhood and adolescence
  • Identity and performativity: a gendered discourse
  • Fluid subjectivities; multiplicity of selves
  • The pedagogical implications of identity in various stages of literacy
  • Virtual selves in virtual worlds
  • The ‘coming of age’ trope in 21st century literature
  • Neoliberal capitalism and the individualistic ‘I’
  • Identity embodied: mixed abilities represented in YA and children’s literature
  • Marginalised identities represented in works of fiction for youth
  • Eco-critical understandings of subjectivity
  • interwoven subjectivities and the individualistic ‘I’

Papers on any children’s or young adult genres are welcome, as are papers that discuss other children’s texts such as film, virtual texts, or graphic novels.  The topics above are a guideline for the proposals we would like to see, but we are eager to receive and review paper proposals on any topic related to children’s and young adult texts.

Please send a 250 word abstract that includes the title of your paper, a list of references in MLA format, a 50-word biography, your name, your university affiliation, email address, and phone number to the review committee at submit.ubc.gradcon@gmail.com. Please include “Conference Proposal” in the subject line of your email.

The conference fee of $18 CAD for students and presenters, and $35 CAD for faculty and professionals, includes morning and afternoon refreshments and a catered lunch.  Please visit our website for more information: http://blogs.ubc.ca/iwillbemyself/


Call for Papers:
Polish Children’s Literature
41st Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference
University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
June 19-21, 2014
Deadline: November 23, 2013
The International Committee of the Children’s Literature Association is planning a special country focus panel on Poland, to be presented at the 41st Children’s Literature Association Conference, held at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC from June 19 through 21, 2014.  The committee invites paper proposals that focus on any aspect of Polish children’s literature.  Papers may focus on the origins of and/or developments in Polish children’s and YA texts;  Polish children’s literature in dialogue with nationalism and/or cultural traumas;  Polish folklore as children’s texts or incorporations of folklore in children’s literature;  trends in contemporary Polish YA fiction and non-fiction;  Polish children’s authors and traditions in conversation with other traditions in Central/Eastern Europe and beyond;  translations of Polish children’s texts into English, or the state of children’s literature studies in Poland.  Preference will be given to proposals with the potential to inspire American and international scholars to develop active interest in Polish children’s literature and to integrate it into their own research.

The authors of two papers selected for the panel to accompany a presentation by the Polish Distinguished Scholar (invited by the committee) will be awarded a $500 travel grant each.  The papers must be presented in English and must not exceed the twenty-minute reading time.  The committee strongly encourages ChLA members and other scholars with an interest in Polish children’s literature to submit paper proposals for the session.  Send 500-word abstracts accompanied by up to 250-word bios to the International Committee, Children’s Literature Association, at info@childlitassn.org with the subject line “International Committee Paper Submission.”  The deadline for submissions is November 23, 2013.

Authors will be notified by December 30, 2013 whether their papers have been selected as part of the panel.  Authors whose papers cannot be accommodated in the panel may then choose to re-submit their papers through the general call;  the deadline for submitting proposals to the 2014 ChLA conference is January 15, 2014.


Call for Papers:
Authenticity, Artifacts, and Publishing Patterns in Multicultural Texts

41st Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference
University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
June 19-21, 2014
Deadline: November 30, 2013

The Diversity Committee of the Children’s Literature Association is seeking papers for its sponsored panel at the ChLA 2014 Conference to be held in Columbia, South Carolina, June 19-21.  (For more information on the conference, visit the ChLA conference website at www.chlaconference.org.)

We are looking for papers that address how "other" cultures are represented in translated, multi-cultural, and cross-cultural texts. Are texts considered "authentic" if they do not conform to common expectations regarding the representation of minority or foreign cultures? Do mainstream perceptions of "authenticity" realistically represent "other" cultural points of view? Does referencing quotidian cultural behaviors, which would not be noted by members of the culture itself, reflect a tendency to treat other cultures as anthropological subjects? Have certain artifacts, narrative structures and themes appeared repeatedly, and through repetition, come to signify authenticity? Have identifiable patterns come to be the publishing and literary equivalents of museum artifacts under glass?

Questions? Contact Claudia Pearson, pearsoncrz@earthlink.net. Email your 500-word abstract and 2-page CV by 30 November 2013, attaching it in .rtf, .doc, or .docx format, and including your email and phone number.


Call for Papers:
Phoenix Award Session

41st Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference
University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
June 19-21, 2014
Deadline: November 30, 2013

The Phoenix Award Committee and the Phoenix Picture Book Award Committee of the Children’s Literature Association are planning a joint session at the 41st Children’s Literature Association Conference, held in Columbia, South Carolina from June 19 to 21, 2014, and hosted by the University of
South Carolina. The Phoenix Awards recognize exceptional books published twenty years previously that did not win a major award at the time, but that the committees have determined to be of lasting value.

The 1994/2014 Phoenix Award goes to Gary Soto for Jesse (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). The Phoenix Honor Book Award winner is Graham Salisbury for Under the Blood-Red Sun (Delacorte).

The Phoenix Picture Book Award, in its second year of existence, goes to Raymond Briggs for The Bear (Random House). Two Honor Books were chosen: Good Night, Gorilla by Peggy Rathmann (Putnam), and Swamp Angel written by Anne Isaacs and illustrated by Paul Zelinsky (Dutton).

Foremost, the panel organizers seek paper proposals that focus scholarly attention on the winning and honor books. Papers on other books by the awarded authors and illustrators are also welcome.

Proposals are due by November 30 to one of the two chairs: Phoenix Committee Chair Lisa Rowe Fraustino (FraustinoL@easternct.edu) or Phoenix Picture Book Committee Chair Eliza Dresang (edresang@uw.edu).

Authors will be notified by January 3, 2014, if their papers have been selected as part of the panel. If not selected for the panel, the authors may elect to submit their papers to the general conference. The call deadline for the 2014 ChLA conference is January 15, 2014.


Call for Papers:
Children’s Literature Association Conference Panel (Southern Studies)

41st Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference
University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
June 19-21, 2014
Deadline: November 30, 2013

We invite paper abstracts for a panel focused on children’s literature, and the U.S. South, broadly conceived.  This year’s ChLA conference takes as its theme the concept of diversity, so we are especially interested in papers that speak to this issue in the context of the American South. Possible interpretations of the theme include (but are certainly not limited to):

-Southern children’s authors
-Canonical Southern authors and artists who have written or illustrated stories, poems, or books for children
-authors outside of the South that write, or have written, about the region
-Evolving representations of the South in U.S. children’s books
-Representations of the U.S. South in international books for children
-the relationship between author and illustrator, as well as publisher in Southern-themed texts
-the political subtext of works about the U.S. South aimed at children
-the Civil Rights Movement and its effect on the creation and publication of works about the South
-the U.S. South and the historical novel
-the Southern economy and children’s literature
-migratory movements into and out of the South and their depiction in children’s literature
-Southern urbanization
-Depictions of race and ethnicity that complicate a Black/White paradigm in children’s books about the South (e.g., Jews, Muslims, Latinos, and Asian-Americans in the South)

The deadline for submissions is November 30th.
Paper abstracts of 200-250 words and CVs should be sent to griffeya@email.sc.edu
Information on this year’s ChLA conference can be found at: http://www.chlaconference.org


Call for Papers:
The International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts

ICFA 35 "Fantastic Empires"
Marriott Orlando Airport Hotel
March 19-23, 2014
Deadline: October 31, 2013

The Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Art Division of the ICFA welcomes papers on any aspect of the fantastic, broadly defined, in Literature, Art, Drama, Film, and Popular Media. This year, we are particularly interested in topics related to our theme, Fantastic Empires. From space operas to medieval tales to seminal works of fantasy, imaginative fiction abounds in fabulous empires. ICFA 35 will investigate the widest range of topics relating to empire, including discussions of particular texts, analyses of the hegemonic and counterhegemonic forces of empire, evaluations of individual resistances to imperialism (and of empires striking back), and assays into various other aspects of the theme. We welcome proposals for scholarly papers and panels that seek to examine, interrogate, and expand any research related to empire and the fantastic.

In addition to essays examining our honored Guests’ work, conference papers might consider specific fantastic empires, imaginative imperial fantasies, the semiotics of empire, fantastic diasporas and migrations, margins and liminal space(s), media empires, technologies of empire, speculative post-nationalism, fantastic Others, myth and empire, geographical/ideological mapping, transnational trauma, the construction/constriction of identity, or the multiple metaphors of empire. Panels might discuss various theories of empire, postcolonialism and the fantastic, language and imperialism, cosmopolitanism in the actual cosmos, Orientalism in classic texts, horrific hordes in film, dystopian empires, or postmodern theory and empire.

Please join us in Orlando in 2014.  We will add your intellectual and creative distinctiveness to our own.  Resistance is futile.

The deadline for submitting proposals is October 31.

For more information on the IAFA and its conference, the ICFA, contact Alaine Martaus (CYA Division Head) at acmartaus@gmail.com or visit the organization’s website  http://iafa.highpoint.edu. To submit a proposal, go to http://iafa.highpoint.edu/icfa-submissions/





Call for Papers
Breaking the Chains: The Underground Railroad in Children’s Literature
NeMLA 2014 Convention
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
April 3-6, 2014
Deadline: September 30, 2013
http://nemla.org/convention/2014/

Papers that examine the depiction and significance of the Underground Railroad in Canadian Children’s literature are welcome. Possible works include Underground Canada by Barbara Smucker (published in the US as Runaway to Freedom), Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Curtis, and A Desperate Road to Freedom: The Underground Railroad Diary of Julia May Jackson by Karleen Bradford, among many others. Papers that examine this theme in American children’s literature are also invited. Please address queries and/or  proposals (250-500 words) and  brief bio to Lesley Clement: lclement@lakeheadu.ca. Deadline: 30 September 2013.


Call for Papers
Children and Childhood Studies,
Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Association Conference
Atlantic City, NJ
November 7 - 9, 2013
Deadline: June 14, 2013

The Children and Childhood Studies Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Association invites you to participate in the annual MAPACA conference. Papers in this area examine the impact of popular culture on children and childhood, the representations of children and childhood in popular culture, and the role children and young adults play as influencers and creators of popular and American culture. Papers from the study of Children's Literature would be most welcome in this area!

Single papers, panels, roundtables, and alternative formats are welcome. Proposals should take the form of 300-word abstracts. The deadline for submission is Friday, June 14, 2013. This year’s conference will be in Atlantic City, NJ, Nov. 7-9, 2013. For the complete call as well info on how to submit a proposal, please see http://mapaca.net/. Please direct any questions about the Children and Childhood Studies area to area chair Patrick Cox at ptcox@camden.rutgers.edu.

MAPACA welcomes proposals on all aspects of popular and American Culture. For a list of MAPACA’s other areas and area chair contact information, visit http://mapaca.net/areas. General questions can be directed to mapaca@mapaca.net.

MAPACA is an inclusive professional organization dedicated to the study of popular and American culture in all their multi-disciplinary manifestations. The association is comprised of college and university faculty, independent scholars and artists, and graduate and undergraduate students. It is a regional division of the Popular Culture and American Culture Association, which, in the words of Popular Culture Association founder Ray Browne, is a “multi-disciplinary association interested in new approaches to the expressions, mass media and all other phenomena of everyday life.”

Call for Papers:
Ecocriticism and Children's Literature
2014 Modern Language Association Annual Convention
Chicago, IL
January 9-13, 2014
Deadline: March 20, 2013
Seeking abstracts on ecocriticism and texts (primarily literary) for children and adolescents. This CFP is in response to the MLA 2014 theme Vulnerable Times. Send 150-200 word abstracts and bio no later than 20 March 2013. MLA deadline for special sessions is 1 April 2013. I ask for bio now, as it is required for special session submission.  Will respond to all submissions.

Lynne Dickson Bruckner
Professor of English, Coordinator for Women's Studies
Chatham University
Woodland Road
Pittsburgh, PA  15232
lbruckner@chatham.edu(412) 365-1185



Call for Papers:
“Children’s Literature and the Common Core”
2014 Modern Language Association Annual Convention
Chicago, IL
January 9-13, 2014
Deadline: March 15, 2013
The Common Core State Standards is an education initiative that is making sweeping changes to the ways that literature will be taught in K-12 schools in the United States.  This educational reform was organized by the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSS0).  It is in the process of being implemented in forty-five states that have adopted the Common Core Standards, with the goals of preparing students for college- or career-ready in literacy by the end of high school. This is an open session proposed by the Division of Children’s Literature and is intended as a continuation of the “National Core Curriculum? A Roundtable with the Past MLA Presidents on the Common Core State Standards Initiative” held at the 2013 MLA.  The format of this session, which requires MLA approval, is that of a roundtable discussion with five speakers familiar with the Common Core Standards who can address how these new standards will affect the teaching of children’s and adolescent literature at the college level.  Given that many students enrolled in children’s and adolescent literature courses at the college level are preparing to become K-12 teachers, the Common Core Standards have the potential to make significant changes to the teaching of children’s and adolescent literature.  Speakers, who must be current MLA members, will be allotted 5-7 minutes for informal presentations. The rest of the session will be devoted to discussion by participants. Potential speakers should submit a 250-word proposal to Jan Susina, jcsusina@ilstu.edu, by March 15, 2013.

Call for Papers:
“Deliver Us to Normal: Children’s Literature and the Midwest”

2014 Modern Language Association Annual Convention
Chicago, IL
January 9-13, 2014
Deadline: March 15, 2013
This panel will consider the ways Midwestern children’s literature both reproduces recognizable tropes associated with the region and subverts or challenges them, often within the same text. Like the Midwest itself, child characters and child readers are highly contested constructions, in a state of continual oscillation between adult desires for them and their own developing agencies. Located in a geographic and discursive middle, sometimes outwardly simple and often deceptively complex, the Midwest finds a fitting home in its children’s literature, which mirrors its critical concerns.

Topics prospective panelists might wish to address include, but are not limited to:
  • children’s literature and competing definitions of the Midwest
  • the roles of Chicago, Detroit, and other Midwestern urban centers in works for children
  • children’s authors who live or lived in the Midwest
  • the Midwest as a colony and/or racial and cultural contact zone
  • the relationship between written text and pictures about/of the Midwest in children’s literature
  • museums and other tourist sites in the Midwest with a relationship to children’s literature, such as the Laura Ingalls Wilder museums in Missouri, Kansas, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
  • depictions of agriculture, farming, and rural life for children
Please send 500-word abstracts by March 15, 2013 to Kate Slater at kslater@ucsd.edu.

This guaranteed panel is sponsored by the Children’s Literature Association. The 2014 MLA will be held in Chicago from January 9-12, 2014.

Call for Papers:
Epistolary Children’s and Young Adult Literature
2014 Modern Language Association Annual Convention
Chicago, IL

January 9-13, 2014
Deadline: March 15, 2013


Children’s and Young Adult literature is replete with first person narratives told through journals or letters in order to create a sense of immediacy and the semblance of truth. The narrative strategies these texts employ seek to replicate or comment ironically on the nonfictional genres of autobiography and memoir. And often readers more comfortably relate to and empathize with first person protagonists.
But what are the problems of epistolary fiction? How do we interpret and analyze these structures and styles when the different modalities are becoming obsolete given our 21st-centry technological moment? This panel is sponsored by the MLA Children’s Literature Division but is not guaranteed. The 2014 MLA will be held in Chicago, January 9-12.

2 page abstracts to Dr. Robyn Schiffman, rls@fdu.edu, by March 15, 2013.


Call for Papers:
Randall Jarrell at 100
2014 Modern Language Association Annual Convention and MLA Executive Committee on Children's Literature
Chicago, IL
January 9-13, 2014
Deadline: March 15, 2013

“All that I’ve never thought of - think of me!”

In commemoration of Randall Jarrell's 100th birthday (May 6, 1914), The Modern Language Association division of Children's Literature is soliciting papers that shed new light on his work. We seek papers that discuss Jarrell as a children’s literature author, a poet, a critic, a novelist and an essayist. We are especially interested in papers on his work as a teacher, his collaborations, translations and influence.
Please send an abstract (400-500 words) and a 2-page CV by Friday, March 15, 2013 to Tali Noimann (cnoimann@bmcc.cuny.edu).



Call for Papers: Panel for NAVSA 2013
Deadline: February 22, 2013
Pasadena, CA
October 23-27, 2013

"Finding the Hidden Adult in Victorian Children’s Literature"

The Victorian era embraced the notion that childhood should be set aside as a time of unbridled play and fantasy, separate from the adult world of work. Yet the worlds of childhood and adulthood were constantly blurring within and alongside books for both kinds of audiences: Catherine Robson notes the presence of men in Wonderland, Claudia Nelson has recently shown that “precocious children” and “childish adults” populate Victorian literature, and Perry Nodelman locates the “hidden adult” in children’s texts.

In keeping with the “Evidence” theme of the NAVSA 2013 conference, this panel seeks presentations that search for evidence of the adult inhabiting the child’s world or the child within the adult. Papers might consider child writers imitating adult-authored literature; adults writing for children or mimicking the child’s voice; adult/child collaborations; case studies of texts that resist age-based audience conventions; and other instances of this boundary-crossing in the Victorian era, as well as the influence of personal history on literary production. Projects concerned with the exchange between different media forms—e.g., text and image; periodicals and bound volumes; “high” culture genres and “low”—are particularly welcome.

Please submit 500 word paper abstracts along with a one-page c.v. to A. Robin Hoffman at Robin.Hoffman@yale.edu and Meghan Rosing at mcr207@lehigh.edu by February 22, 2013



Call for Papers
"Re-visioning Alcott: Her Impact on the Work of Later Writers and Artists"
Deadline: January 21, 2013


Annual Conference of the American Literature Association
May 23-26, 2013
Westin Copley Place. Boston, Massachusetts

Writers as esteemed and influential as Gertrude Stein, Adrienne Rich, Cynthia Ozick, and J. K. Rowling have acknowledged a debt to Louisa May Alcott. References to and re-visionings of Alcott’s writing and life have appeared in the work of such authors as Joyce Carol Oates, Barbara Kingsolver, Geraldine Brooks, Lynda Barry, and many others. Alcott’s work has also been translated to stage and screen, in such forms as musicals, mini-series, and anime. And dozens of artists have created illustrations, including May Alcott, Frank Merrill, Jessie Willcox Smith, Norman Rockwell, Barbara Cooney, and Tasha Tudor. This session will seek to trace Alcott’s impact on the work of writers and artists who have come after, and will consider how engagement with her work—fleeting or substantial—makes meaning in these later settings and perhaps revises our thinking about Alcott. Please send 200-300 word abstracts electronically to Bev Clark at bclark@wheatonma.edu. The deadline for proposals is Monday, January 21, 2013. Early submissions welcome.



Call for Papers:
“Celebrating the Sesquicentennial of Louisa May Alcott's _Hospital Sketches_: A Teaching Round Table”

Deadline: January 21, 2013

Annual Conference of the American Literature Association
May 23-26, 2013
Westin Copley Place. Boston, Massachusetts

Published in 1863 to immediate success as the Civil War sloughed into its second year, _Hospital Sketches_ is now available in several paperback editions, most with excellent introductions detailing its relevance in a variety of classrooms—from literature and history in general to women’s, gender, African American, and disability studies in particular. We seek abstracts describing successful classroom strategies that feature _Hospital Sketches_ or that present Alcott as an important figure in antislavery reform, women's history, and popular literature of the Civil War. In which kinds of classrooms is _Hospital Sketches_ an effective springboard for examining the development of the Women’s Central Association of Relief as an arm of the US Sanitary Commission, and for calling attention to the need for post-war freedmen’s education? How does Nurse Periwinkle’s increasing ambivalence toward the war enable us to provide students with a more realistic grasp of the human cost of this still too-often romanticized military conflict? How does Alcott’s treatment of racial themes in this text compare with similar considerations in her other work? How does _Hospital Sketches_ usefully complement themes observable in other works that treat the Civil War, not only in Alcott’s writings but in those authored by other (and later) writers?  Please send brief abstracts to Sandy Petrulionis at shp2@psu.edu by January 21, 2013.


Illustration, Comics, and Animation Conference
Deadline:
December 1, 2012

What is the future of illustration studies?

What can comics scholars learn from animation studies and vice versa?

Do illustrated books or graphic novels resist the supposed obsolescence of the book? What do pictures want (now)?

These and related questions will be explored at the Illustration, Comics, and Animation Conference at Dartmouth College to be held April 19 – 21 2013.

Scholars interested in the illustrated image in all of its mediated guises are invited to participate in this interdisciplinary conference. Nearly all illustrated or drawn ‘texts’ are eligible for consideration:

  • comics and graphic novels
  • cartoons and animated films
  • picture books
  • illustrated books

And given the uniquely plenary nature of the conference, which brings together scholarship on static and moving illustrations, preference will be given to proposals that seek to bridge visual media. Possible topics may include:

  • Individual titles by prominent practitioners in the field
  • Identity, subjectivity, authority, ideology or culture in or more type of illustration media
  • The future of particular schools of criticism (psychoanalysis, critical race theory, phenomenology, Marxism, feminism, queer theory, post-colonialism, formalism, aesthetic theories, etc.) and one or more type of illustration media

The location of the conference may also be a source of inspiration for prospective participants. Not only does Dartmouth College lie in close proximity to the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont, but it is also the historic home of Theodor Geisel, Dr. Seuss, whose illustrated books continue to awe and amuse.

Interested participants may propose individual papers or panels. Individual papers should be no longer than 20 minutes. Panels shall be ninety minutes long and should be comprised of three presenters and one (ideally separate) panel chair. Please send 300 word abstracts and a brief bio for each proposed paper no later than December 1, 2012.

Send all proposals and inquiries to Michael A. Chaney (michael.chaney@dartmouth.edu)


Call for Papers:
Phoenix Award Session
Deadline:
November 30, 2012

40th Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference
University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, Mississippi
June 13-15, 2013

The Phoenix Award Committee and the Phoenix Picture Book Award Committee of the Children’s Literature Association are planning a joint session at the 40th Children’s Literature Association Conference, held in Biloxi, Mississippi from June 13 to 15, 2013 and hosted by the University of Southern Mississippi. The Phoenix Awards recognize books published twenty years previously that did not win a major award at the time, but that the committees have determined to be of lasting value.

Gaye Hiçyilmaz, the author of The Frozen Waterfall (FSG), is the winner of the 1993/2013 Phoenix Award. The Phoenix Honor Book Award winner is Walter Dean Myers for Malcolm X: By Any Means Necessary (Scholastic).

The very first Phoenix Picture Book Award goes to Owen, written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes (Greenwillow). In the Small Pond, written and illustrated by Denise Fleming, was chosen as an Honor Book.

Foremost, the panel organizers seek paper proposals that focus on the winning and honor books. Papers on other books by the awarded authors and illustrators are also welcome.

Proposals are due by November 30 to one of the two chairs: Phoenix Committee Chair Lisa Rowe Fraustino (FraustinoL@easternct.edu) or Phoenix Picture Book Committee Chair Linnea Hendrickson (linnea.borealis@gmail.com).

Authors will be notified by January 4, 2013, if their papers have been selected as part of the panel. If not selected for the panel, the authors may elect to submit their papers to the general conference; the call deadline for the 2013 ChLA conference is January 15, 2013.


Call for Papers:
Croatian Children’s Literature
Deadline:
November 30, 2012

40th Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference
University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, Mississippi
June 13-15, 2013

The International Committee of the Children’s Literature Association is planning a special country focus panel on Croatia, to be presented at the 40th Children’s Literature Association Conference, held in Biloxi, Mississippi from June 13 to 15, 2013 and hosted by the University of Southern Mississippi. The committee invites paper proposals that focus on any aspect of Croatian children’s literature. Papers may focus on the origins of and/or developments in Croatian children’s and YA texts; Croatian children’s literature in dialogue with nationalism and/or cultural traumas; Croatian folklore as children’s texts or incorporations of folklore in children’s literature; trends in contemporary Croatian YA fiction and non-fiction; Croatian children’s authors and traditions in conversation with other traditions both in the Balkans and beyond; translations of Croatian children’s texts into English, or the state of children’s literature studies in Croatia. Preference will be given to proposals with the potential to inspire American and international scholars to develop active interest in Croatian children’s literature and to integrate it into their own research.

The authors of two papers selected for the panel to accompany a presentation by the Croatian Distinguished Scholar (invited by the committee) will be awarded a $500 travel grant each. The papers must be presented in English and must not exceed the twenty-minute reading time. The committee strongly encourages ChLA members and other scholars with an interest in Croatian children’s literature to submit paper proposals for the session. Send 500-word abstracts accompanied by up to 250-word bios to the International Committee, Children’s Literature Association at info@childlitassn.org with the subject line “International Committee Paper Submission.” The deadline for submissions is November 30, 2012.

Authors will be notified by January 4, 2013 if their papers have been selected as part of the panel. If not selected for the panel, the authors may elect to submit their papers to the general conference; the call deadline for the 2013 ChLA conference is January 15, 2013.


Call for Papers:
“Performances of Diversity, Race, Culture or Gender in Children’s and Young Adult Literature”
Deadline: November 30, 2012

40th Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference
University of Southern Mississippi, Biloxi, Mississippi
June 13-15, 2013

Historically, Americans have performed in black face and minstrel shows, donned headdresses and other ethnic-specific garb, cross-dressed, and mimicked AAVE (African American Vernacular English) and ethnic speech, among numerous other examples. These performances have varying designs, but they all call attention to difference and often reinforce ideas of superiority and exclusion. In various ways, writers of children’s and young adult literature have contributed to this practice, representing – and more often misrepresenting – diversity, race, ethnicity, class, culture, or gender through performances meant to reenact the Other.    

For this panel, we invite papers that explore instances in children’s literature of children or personified animals performing diversity through dress, gesture, speech of other behavior.      

If you have questions, please contact Michelle Pagni Stewart (mstewart@msjc.edu) or Mpale Silkiluwasha (mpaleyvonne@hotmail.com). Email your 500-word abstract and 2-page CV to both emails by 30 November 2012, attaching your abstract in .rtf, .doc, or .docx format, and including your email and phone number.

Authors will be notified by January 4, 2013, if their papers have been selected as part of the panel. If not selected for the panel, the authors may elect to submit their papers to the general conference; the call deadline for the 2013 ChLA conference is January 15, 2013.








Call for Papers:
Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context
Deadline: November 16, 2012

34th Annual Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference
February 13 – 16, 2013
Albuquerque, NM
http://www.swtxpca.org
This year, our 34th, we are “Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context.”  In keeping with this conference theme, the Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture area solicits proposals dealing with journeys, quests, voyages, and globetrotting activities in children’s and young adult literature and culture.  Papers may address these ideas from literal, physical, metaphorical, psychological, spiritual, or ideological perspectives.  We highly encourage “thinking outside the box” with this theme.  While papers addressing the conference or area theme will be given preference, papers addressing other aspects in children’s and young adult literature and culture will be read with interest.

Scholars, researchers, professionals, teachers, graduate students and others interested in this area are encouraged to submit an abstract. Graduate students are especially encouraged and will be assisted in accessing any and all award opportunities the conference and/or associations provide.  Award categories can be found here
.  Upon acceptance of a proposal, I send out information on which awards would be most suited to the subject matter of the presentation.

Again, given our conference theme this year, we would like to encourage scholars and students outside of the United States to submit proposals.  However, all potential presenters need to be aware that our conference rules state that participants must present their papers in person at the conference.  Given the more complex nature of international travel these days, we encourage international proposals be submitted as early as possible so as to provide enough time to make those travel arrangements.

All proposals need to be submitted using our conference submission database at
http://conference2013.swtxpca.org.  This database is used to send out acceptance notifications, organize panels, and put the conference program together.  It is important for all submitters to enter their contact information and presentation proposal information into the database to avoid confusion.

This area covers a wide variety of possible mediums: traditional book/literature culture, but also comics, graphic novels, film, television, music, video games, toys, internet environment, fan fiction, advertising, marketing tie-ins to books and films, just to name a few.  Proposals on fiction, non-fiction, poetry, or cross-genre topics are welcome.  Interdisciplinary approaches are especially welcome, as are presentations that go beyond the traditional scholarly paper format.

Please submit proposals of 250 words and a brief bio (100 words) for individual presentations or 500 words for full panels (3-4 people on a panel – please submit contact and brief bio for each person on the panel) to our conference database at
http://conference2013.swtxpca.org.

Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012.

All accepted presenters will have to register for the conference by December 31, 2012.

For questions or if you encounter problems with submitting proposals to the database, please contact Diana Dominguez, Area Chair.  Please put SWTX in the subject line so I can filter the messages effectively:  Contact info:

Diana Dominguez
Area Chair: Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture
gypsyscholar@rgv.rr.comThe University of Texas at Brownsville

Please visit the Conference website for information on registration, accommodations, transportation options, graduate student paper awards, and audio-visual arrangements.


http://www.swtxpca.org


Call for Papers:
Fantastic Adaptations, Transformations, and Audiences

Deadline: October 31, 2012

The 34th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Marriott Orlando Airport Hotel
March 20-24, 2013

ICFA 34 will explore the ubiquity of adaptation in all its Fantastic forms. Conference papers might consider specific adaptations, adaptation theory, translation, elision and interpolation, postmodern pastiche, transformation and metafictionality, plagiarism and homage, audience and adaptation, franchise fiction, or the recent resurgence of reboots, retcons, remakes, and reimaginings.

Guests of Honor: Neil Gaiman and Kij Johnson Guest Scholar: Constance Penley

We welcome paper proposals on all aspects of the fantastic, and especially encourage papers on the work of our special guests and attending authors. The Children's and Young Adult Literature and Art Division is particularly interested in papers on all aspects of the fantastic in literature aimed at younger readers, including picture books, middle-grade and young adult texts, and graphic novels. Paper proposals must consist of a 500-word proposal accompanied by an appropriate bibliography, and a 300-word abstract.

To submit a proposal for the Children's and Young Adult Literature and Art Division, please contact Alaine Martaus (acmartaus@gmail.com). For information about other divisions, or about how to propose panel sessions or participate in creative programming at the conference, please see our website at www.iafa.org

The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2012. Participants will be notified by November 15, 2012, if they are accepted to the conference. Attendees may present only one paper at the conference and should not submit to multiple divisions. If you are uncertain as to which Division you should submit your proposal, please contact Sherryl Vint (sherryl.vint@gmail.com).



Society for the History of Children and Youth, June 25-27, 2013
Conference Theme: “Space and Childhood in History”
Deadline:
October 15, 2012


The Sixth Biennial Conference of the Society for the History of Children and Youth will be held June 25-27, 2013, at the University of Nottingham in Great Britain.
The Program Committee invites scholars to submit proposals for formal panels, roundtable discussions, and research-in-progress workshops on any aspect of the histories of children and youth, from any place and in any era. But we are especially interested in sessions that examine and compare how space and childhood are mutually constitutive in historically and geographically specific settings. Our call, inspired by the French political philosopher Henri Lefebvre, posits that for any person, including children and youth, there is a dynamic rather than a static relationship between a physical place, its social make-up, and childhood as an ideal or imagined condition. The production of space, as Lefebvre famously insisted, happens in the physical world, the social world, and the imagined world. We ask scholars to investigate space not just as a backdrop for the lived experiences of children but as a tangible, social, and discursive construction, which shapes and is shaped by the lives and experiences of children. Although the committee prefers proposals for complete sessions and panels that incorporate international representation and global perspectives, individual papers will also be considered.


Session guidelines
Sessions will last approximately 90 minutes. At least fifteen minutes should be reserved for audience discussion. This may mean fewer—or shorter—formal papers, entertaining comments from the audience rather than scheduling a formal commentator, etc.


Submitting proposals
In order to be considered for the program, proposals must be received no later than October 31, 2012. They should include the following information:

  1. Session title (or title of individual paper)
  2. The session organizer’s name, department, institution, address, and e-mail address
  3. The following information for all participants:

--Names and roles (paper-presenter, chair, discussant, etc.)
--department and institution
--address and e-mail address

  1. 250-word abstract for each paper
  2. 2-pp. CV for each participant
  3. Please state what, if any, audio-visual technology will be required for each session or paper.

All parts of the proposal should be gathered into one PDF document and sent as an email attachment to james.marten@marquette.edu. The program committee will finalize decisions no later than January 31, 2013.


Direct queries to the co-chairs of the program committee:
James Marten, Marquette University, james.marten@marquette.edu
Marta Gutman, City College of New York, mgutman@ccny.cuny.edu
The other members of the committee are:
Margot Hillel, Australian Catholic University
Mary Clare Martin, University of Greenwich
Dirk Schumann, Universität Göttingen
Nicholas Syrett, University of Northern Colorado




Visualizing Adolescent Girlhood
Society of Cinema and Media Studies Conference
Deadline:
July 1, 2012

Society of Cinema and Media Studies Conference
March 6-10, 2013 in Chicago

At the turn of the twentieth century, the adolescent girl was seminally defined by American psychologist G. Stanley Hall as a highly plastic and transformative figure. Conceptualized as an unfinished identity, “the budding girl” could be molded to represent any set of cultural anxieties and desires.

This panel aims to investigate the visual narratives that have been projected onto the figure of the adolescent girl throughout the decades. Preferably, but not exclusively, papers are invited to ponder on the birth of female adolescence and its intersection with a new mechanized visual culture, symbolized by automated toys, film technology, and portable photographic cameras. How was the figure of the girl visualized and scripted at the time of its cultural emergence? How did these foundational figurations affect the way adolescent girlhood would be constructed in the decades to come? Which visual prototypes are still being reproduced, reinvented, or refused today, and why? Were adolescent girls utilized as mere visual vessels, or did they actively intervene in the production and reception of mass representations of girlhood? If female adolescence is specific to a transitional moment in American culture, how did this developmental phase translate interculturally?

Other possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Issues of agency and self-representation;
• Fan production and fan reception;
• Media specificity and feminist subversiveness;
• Race and the role of adolescent girlhood in early consumer culture;
• Celebrity culture and girl-stars.

Please submit a 250-word abstract to: danselmo@uci.edu



Children and Childhood Studies Section
Mid Atlantic Popular/American Culture Annual (MAPACA) Conference
Deadline:
June 15, 2012


The Mid-Atlantic Popular/American Culture Association (MAP/ACA) invites
academics, graduate and undergraduate students, independent scholars, and
artists to submit papers for the annual fall conference to be held in
Pittsburgh, PA. MAP/ACA is an inclusive professional organization dedicated
to the study of Popular Culture and American Culture in all their
multidisciplinary manifestations.

The Children and Childhood Studies Section focuses on the societal,
cultural, and political forces which shape the lives of children and the
concept of childhood. CCS research draws from the behavioral and social
sciences as well as the arts. Papers in this area examine the impact of
popular culture on children and childhood, as well as the role of children
and young adults as influencers and creators of that popular culture.

Those interested in presenting at the conference are invited to submit one
proposal or panel to one MAPACA area chair by June 15, 2012. Include a
brief bio with your proposal. Single papers, as well as 3 or 4 person
panels and roundtables, are encouraged.

To submit proposals in the area of Children and Childhood Studies contact:

Vibiana Bowman Cvetkovic
Paul Robeson Library
Rutgers The State University
Camden, New Jersey 08102
vibiana@gmail.com



About the Conference:

Conference date: November 1-3, 2012
Place: Wyndham Grand Hotel, Pittsburgh
Conference Web site: http://www.mapaca.net
Facebook: facebook.com/mapacanet
Twitter: @mapacanet


Children and Fame
ChLA-sponsored session at MLA
Deadline:
March 15, 2012

Media critics often discuss how Americans are hooked on fame starting from childhood. Many popular book series have protagonists who suddenly find themselves famous and must learn how to negotiate that fame. These series, along with many YA films, perpetuate the idea that given the right circumstances anyone can be famous. This panel -- held at the MLA in Boston, January 2013 -- will investigate the relationship between children and fame. How do authors and directors present fame? What are the different attitudes regarding fame presented in texts? Do texts with famous protagonists fuel American readers’ fascination with fame? Does fan fiction exist because of our addiction to fame? Please send 500 word abstracts and a short bio by Mar 15, 2012 to Nicole Wilson, n.wilson@wayne.edu.


Theorizing the Early Reader Chapter Book
MLA 2013

Deadline: March 15, 2012


Theorizing the Early Reader Chapter Book

Early readers, such as the Babymouse, Judy Moody and Stink, Keena Ford, Ivy and Bean, and Ruby Lu series, are designed to be a young reader's first multi-chapter, independent reading experience. More advanced than easy readers, frequently written as a series, often only lightly illustrated, and representative of a variety of genres, these novels too often fly below the critical radar.

For presentation at MLA 2013 in Boston, we invite papers invested in a critical, theoretical analysis of the category of contemporary early readers.


Send abstracts (about two pages) to
Abbye Meyer, University of Connecticut: abbyemeyer@gmail.com


Make Way for Boston: Children’s Literature and New England
2013 MLA
Deadline:
March 15, 2012

2013 MLA (Boston, MA, 3-6 Jan. 2013)

The beginnings of children’s literature in America predate the nation, but not the region. In 1686, the publication of the New England Primer heralded a centuries-long tradition of books for children and young people written in, on, and around New England. These works show that constructions of places and people are not wholly separate processes; in their convergence, they produce complex and multi-faceted environments. Just as it is impossible to consider “the child” as a singular entity, it is equally impossible to conceive of a single “New England.” Both formations are heterogeneous, intricate, and highly dependent upon subjective perspective. This panel will consider not only the different New Englands readers encounter through various texts for children, but — concurrent with the MLA 2013 Presidential Theme of “Avenues of Access” — also how the region itself has both prevented and promoted access to children’s literature.

Questions and subjects prospective panelists might wish to pursue include but are not limited to:

· the role of publishers. Houghton Mifflin, Candlewick, David R. Godine, Beacon all have offices in Boston, the city that was also home to earlier publishers of works for children (E.P. Dutton, Lothrop and Lee, Munroe and Francis, Ticknor and Fields, the American Tract Society, Isaiah Thomas)

· the role of librarians from the region, such as Caroline M. Hewins, Minerva Sanders, Alice M. Jordan

· magazines for children, such as Our Young Folks (pub. by Atlantic Monthly), Youth’s Cabinet, The Student and Schoolmate, Parley’s Magazine, Oliver Optic’s Magazine, Robert’s Merry Museum(founded by Samuel Goodrich and edited by Louisa May Alcott)

· Horn Book. Based in Boston, the influential publication has, since 1924, provided reviews of and essays on children’s books.

· the mid-19th century popularity of world histories and geographies for children, written and published in New England by Samuel Goodrich, Jacob Abbott, and others

· authors who live or lived in New England, such as Louisa May Alcott, M.T. Anderson, Sandra Boynton, Virginia Lee Burton, Eric Carle, Lydia Maria Child, Robert Cormier, Eleanor Estes, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Crockett Johnson, Ruth Krauss, Robert Lawson, Lois Lowry, Robert McCloskey, Gregory Macguire, Eleanor H. Porter, H.A. and Margret Rey, Maurice Sendak, Dr. Seuss, Marc Simont, Lane Smith, Chris Van Allsburg,, E. B. White, and Mo Willems. We welcome considerations of New England authors not traditionally acknowledged as writers for children, but who wrote for children nonetheless (such as Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, and Alice Cary) as well as those whose works are assigned to young readers even if not necessarily intended for them (J.D. Salinger, Sylvia Plath, Junot Diaz)

· books set in New England, such as: The New England Primer (1686), Jacob Abbott’s Rollo books (1835-1858), Samuel Griswold Goodrich’s Peter Parley series (1827-1859), Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868-69), Alice Cary’s Snow-Berries: A Book for Young Folks (1867), Kate Douglas Wiggin’s Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (1903), Eleanor H. Porter’s Pollyanna (1913), Rachel Field’s Hitty, Her First Hundred Years (1929), E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web (1952) and The Trumpet of the Swan (1970), Robert McCloskey’s Make Way for Ducklings (1941) and many books set in Maine (Blueberries for Sal, One Morning in Maine, Time of Wonder), Chris Van Allsburg’s The Stranger (1986), Dr. Seuss’s And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street (1937), Oliver Butterworth’s The Enormous Egg (1956), Robert Lawson’s Rabbit Hill (1944), Esther Forbes’s Johnny Tremain (1943), Joan W. Blos’s A Gathering of Days: A New England Girl’s Journal, 1830-32 (1979), Elizabeth George Speare’s The Witch of Blackbird Pond (1958), Jacqueline Briggs Martin’s Snowflake Bentley (1998), Virginia Hamilton’s Anthony Burns: The Defeat and Triumph of a Fugitive Slave (1988), Eleanor Estes’ The Moffats books (1941-1943, 1983), Lois Lowry’s Anastasia Krupnick series (1979-1995), Jeanne Birdsall’s The Penderwicks series (2005-), Robert Cormier’s The Chocolate War (1974) and I Am the Cheese (1977), M.T. Anderson’s The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation (2006-2008).

By 15 March 2012, please send 500-word abstracts to Philip Nel (philnel@ksu.edu) and Kate Slater (kslater@ucsd.edu). Panelists will need to be members of the MLA by 7 April 2012.

This panel is sponsored by the MLA’s Children’s Literature Division but is not guaranteed. The 2013 MLA will be held in Boston, 3-6 January 2013.


Women in German (WiG) and Children's Literature Division of the MLA

co-sponsored panel for the Modern Language Association Annual Conference (Boston, January 3-6, 2013)

Deadline: March 15, 2012

Child Protagonists in [German] Literature and Film

This panel seeks papers on literature and films of the 20th century that portray children and youth (especially girls) in Germany and other European countries. In contrast to the stereotypically naïve image of children, literary and filmic child protagonists often demonstrate agency and the ability to operate independently of adults. We invite paper proposals that consider children and youth in this role. Genres may include travel literature, adventure, and fantasy; presenters may choose to focus on German-language texts or films, works in translation, or English-language texts or films dealing with (German-speaking) Europe. Presentations on works by German-speaking women, writers in exile, and minority writers are particularly welcome. Send abstracts (maximum 250 words) by March 15, 2012 to Jennifer Redmann, Franklin & Marshall College (jennifer.redmann@fandm.edu) and Lara Saguisag, Rutgers University (malasa@camden.rutgers.edu). (Note: this is not a guaranteed panel).


International Conference on Children's Literature: The Child in the Book
Deadline EXTENDED:
March 16, 2012

Children’s literature as a field of academic study has grown steadily in Taiwan over the past several years. Many other Asian nations have also seen a concerted interest in both the production and criticism of literature for young people. This interest has given rise to the creation of the Taiwan Children’s Literature Research Association (TCLRA), a distinctly Taiwanese organization in the process of formation that is dedicated to the study of children’s and young adult literature. The first action of the TCLRA is this conference, held in conjunction with the Children’s Literature Association (ChLA), that seeks to unite Asian scholars of children’s literature with each other and with scholars from regions where the study of children’s literature has had a longer tradition.

By focusing the theme for this conference on “the Child in the Book” we wish to interrogate the ways in which children and childhood are constructed in texts for young people from a variety of cultures and perspectives. What ideas lay behind the representation of children in literary texts? What assumptions are made about potential readers? If childhood is a shifting idea that is ideologically constructed, then how do these ideas shift between texts written by or for people in different national contexts? Do the historical ideas of childhood that have played such an extensive role in North American and European societies translate to other societies and cultures? While issues of childhood representations in all settings are welcome, of special concern is the representation of cultures and diversity in Asian contexts as well as with Asians in non-Asian settings.

The following are suggested topics, but other ideas implied by the title are also welcome.

· Children and childhood in Asia

· Children in translation

· Comparative perspectives of childhood

· Minority childhoods

· Refuge children

· Children and war

· Immigration and childhood

· Cross-cultural childhoods and experiences

· Representations of adolescence

· Representations of diversity

· Questions of authenticity in representation

· Childhood in graphic novels

· Childhood in non-print media (film, theater, video games)

· Media representations of children

· Children as writers

· Child narrators and focalizers

Please email abstracts with fewer than 500 words and three to five keywords with brief resume to TCLRA Conference Committee (tclra101@gmail.com)

Deadline EXTENDED for abstracts to March 16, 2012.
Notification of acceptance by March 30

For further information, go to www.scu.edu.tw/english/TCLRA2012

Deadline EXTENDED: 16 March 2012

ACLAR 2012
Deadline:
February 29, 2012

‘If We’re Being Honest: The Facts and Fictions of Children’s Literature’

The 2012 Biennial Conference of the Australasian Children’s Literature Association for Research (ACLAR)

National Library of Australia, Canberra ACT, June 20 – 22, 2012

Debates about notions of honesty, openness, innocence and agency have abounded in both the study and practice of children’s and young adult literature. The 2012 Biennial ACLAR conference will explore the contemporary tensions between some of these key debates, with particular emphasis upon the role of children’s literature in the digital world. Confirmed keynote speakers include Prof. Clare Bradford (Deakin University) and writer/illustrator Shaun Tan.

Presenters are invited to submit abstracts exploring aspects of the conference theme; ‘If We’re Being Honest: The Facts and Fictions of Children’s Literature’.

Such explorations may address one of the following strands:

Making It Up (fictionality, the dynamics of truth and fiction)

To Educate and Protect (didacticism, ideology)

The Glass Half Full (optimism/pessimism and the future)

Drawing the Lines (readerships, social change, boundary transgressions)

Writing the iChild (technology, shifting modes of narrative)

Sex and Me (sexuality, gender, identity)

Let Us All Rejoice? (Australian identity, national consciousness)

Powered by History (steampunk, Victoriana, the role of the past in the narratives of the present)

The Death of the (Children’s) Author (the author as ‘personality’, the implied author, the children’s or YA writer as arbiter of public discourse)

This Imperfect Tomorrow (Dystopia/Catastrophe literature)

Places and Spaces (landscape, liminality)

Applicants are also welcome to submit abstracts exploring alternative strands that relate to the overall conference theme.

Abstracts should directly address the conference theme and should identify specific texts, theoretical and/or methodological approaches to be discussed. For an individual, 20-minute paper, abstracts should be no more than 250 words. Groups wishing to collaborate on the presentation of 60 or 90-minute panels should submit an abstract of up to 500 words, detailing how the overall presentation will fit into the conference theme, the individual critical and theoretical approaches to be taken by each speaker, and the envisaged structure for the session. All panel sessions should include time for Q&A with each speaker, and 90-minute panels would ideally include some time for a discussion with the entire panel.

Papers can address both critical and/or practice-led approaches to the study of children’s literature.

Abstracts should be submitted by email to: tony.eaton[at]canberra.edu.au with the heading ‘ACLAR Abstract’

Submissions Open: August 1, 2011

Submissions Close: 29 Feb, 2012


Race, Girlhood, and Social Justice in Children's Literature
MLA 2013
Deadline:
March 1, 2012

MLA 2013
Boston, January 3-6, 2013

This proposed panel will explore the intersections of race, girlhood and social justice in children?s literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Focusing especially upon the work of children?s authors and illustrators of color, this panel will examine how and why narratives of girlhood often function as a medium for social commentary. Through the lens of literature, we will also consider how race, gender, and sexuality shape the contours of coming-of-age for girls in the United States and beyond. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: twentieth- and twenty-first-century multi-ethnic narratives of girlhood, such as the works of Cynthia Kadohata, Jacqueline Woodson, Julia Alvarez, Louise Erdrich, and Ed Young; teaching narratives of race and girlhood, from K-12 to the college-level; transnational representations of girlhood and race; and, African American girlhood and children?s literature of the U.S. Civil Rights movement. Please send a 250-word abstract and a 1-page CV to Kristen Proehl, kproehl_at_clemson.edu, and Sharon Holland, sharon.holland_at_duke.edu, by March 1, 2012.


Children’s Literature and European Avant-Garde
European Science Foundation
Deadlne:
March 1, 2012

ESF-Liu-Research Conference
Linköping University, Sweden, 26-29 September 2012.
Chair: Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer (University of Tübingen)
Co-Chairs: Elina Druker (University of Stockholm), Maria Nikolajeva (University of Cambridge)

The conference, which is fully funded by the European Science Foundation (www.esf.org), is a first step towards the investigation of the complex and mutual influences of Avant-Garde movements on children’s literature in different European and non-European countries during the 20th century. Since modern children’s literature in these countries is obviously influenced by Avant-Garde concepts until the present, the topic of the conference reveals a timeless approach which will help to enlarge the historical and theoretical context of children’s literature in a European context.

It is one aim of this conference to bring together those scholars who are interested into the relationship between avant-garde movements and children’s culture (i.e. arts, literature, toys, films for children) within a European context. Since Avant-garde movements were particularly strong in countries such as Czechoslovakia, Germany, Italy, Russia, Spain, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the Nordic countries, this conference focuses on the mutual influences of European Avant-garde movements and children’s literature in these respective countries. Moreover, the impact of the European Avant-Garde on Non-European children’s literature, for instance in Brazil, Japan or the United States, should be investigated as well.

Possible topics include:

• Theoretical and historical reflections on the literary and artistic discourse of the relationship between children’s literature and Avant-Garde movements

• Artistic and literary experimentation in Avant-Garde children’s literature

• The combination of media in single artworks

• The material effectivity of the avant-garde

• The interference of pedagogical and artistic debates on the development of new art forms

• Impact of European Avant-Garde on Non-European children’s literature

• Avant-garde publishers for children

• Children’s culture and the Bauhaus at Weimar/Dessau

• Afterlife of Avant-Garde art and literature in modern children’s literature written after World War II

• Influence of specific Avant-Garde movements, such as Constructivism, Expressionism, Surrealism, New Realism and Pop Art

• Avant-Garde toys and films for children

Contributions from academics and experts interested in any of these areas and in international perspectives are particularly welcome. An active participation by early stage researchers is required, therefore we especially encourage ph d students and early researchers to submit a proposal (for a short talk or a poster session).

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Sandra Beckett (Brock University)
Tone Birkeland (Bergen University College)
Juan Bordes (Madrid)
Nina Christensen (Children’s Book Centre, University of Aarhus/Copenhagen)
Albert Luiz Coelho (University of Rio de Janeiro)
Sirke Happonen (University of Helsinki)
Mikhail Karasik (St. Petersburg)
Lena Kåreland (University of Uppsala)
Albert Lemmens & Serge Stommels (Nijmegen)
Patricia Molins (Museum Reina Sofia, Madrid)
Philip Nel (Kansas State University)
Marilynn Olson (Texas State University)
Sara Pankenier (Bard College, Boston)
Michael Siebenbrodt (Klassikstiftung Weimar)
Petra Timmer (Amsterdam)

The format of the conference consists of a plenary format (no parallel sessions) with lectures given by the keynote speakers, short talks (20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes for discussion), and poster sessions.

There are plans to publishing a volume of selected papers afterwards in book form.

Grants are available for students and early stage researchers to cover the conference fees and possibly part of the travel costs (see application form on the ESF-website).

The deadline for proposals is: 1 March 2012.
Notification of acceptance: April 2012
For submitting an abstract and for further information about the conference please go to the ESF-website at: www.esf.org/index.php?id=9078
For any inquiries concerning the conference, contact the chair Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer at: bettina.kuemmerling-meibauer@uni-tuebingen.de or the conference officer Anne Blondeel-Oman at: ablondeel@efs.org


Stranger in a Strange Land: Exploring Texts and Media for Young People across Cultures and Continents
Deadline:
March 1, 2012

A Peer Reviewed Graduate Student Conference on Children’s Literature and Cultural Texts
With keynote speakers Dr. Elizabeth Marshall and Dr. Sarah Park

The University of British Columbia
Saturday, April 28, 2012


This is a one-day conference showcasing graduate research that explores and questions any facet of children’s literature. You are invited to submit a paper proposal that contributes to and extends existing research in the area of children’s texts,
which may include novels, film, picture books, and other culturally produced
modes of children’s literature. We are particularly interested in research that
draws upon the broadly interpreted themes of navigation, exploration, and
narrative.


Topics may include, but are not limited to:
• The child or young adult as explorer/explored, navigator/navigated
• Displacement or unwilling transportation to foreign spaces
• Childhood and adolescent development
• Children, young adults, and cross-cultural exposure
• Multilingual or translated texts
• Navigating (or negotiating) identity, gender, race or religion as a child or young adult in an adult world
• Exploring place: the child as traveller/runaway/adventurer in a strange land
• Race and ethnicity in children’s and young adult texts
• Cultural, physical, psychological, ideological, or literary restrictions and barriers to
exploration and imagination
• Childhood feelings of displacement or not fitting in


Papers on any children’s or young adult genres are welcome as are papers that discuss other children’s texts such as film, virtual texts, or graphic novels. The topics above are a guideline for the proposals we would like to see, but we are eager to receive and review paper proposals on any topic related to children’s and young adult texts.

Please send a 250 word abstract, the title of your paper, a 50-word biography, your name, your university affiliation, email address, and phone number to Robert Bittner at ubc.conference2012@gmail.com by March 1, 2012. Please put “Conference Proposal” in the subject line of your email.

If you would like your paper to be considered for publication in the Journal of Graduate Research in Young People’s Materials and Culture, please send a complete and polished copy of your paper to the editors at jgr.submission@yahoo.ca by June 15, 2012. Include the same information as your conference proposal, but attach the full text as well. All submissions to JGR are peer reviewed.

The conference fee of $18 for students and presenters, and $35 for faculty and professionals, includes morning and afternoon refreshments and a catered lunch. Please visit our website for more information: http://blogs.ubc.ca/childlitconference2012/


Children's Literature and European Avant-Garde
Deadline:
March 1, 2012



Linköping University, Sweden, 26-30 September 2012.

For submitting an abstract and for
further information about the conference please go to the ESF-website:
www.esf.org/index.php?id=9078


The conference, which is fully funded by the European Science Foundation, is a first step towards the investigation of the complex and
mutual influences of Avant-Garde movements on children's literature in different European and non-European countries during the 20th century.

It is one aim of this conference to bring together those scholars who are interested into the relationship between avant-garde movements and
children's culture (i.e. arts, literature, toys, films for children) within a European context. Since Avant-garde movements were particularly
strong in countries such as Czechoslovakia, Germany, Italy, Russia, Spain, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the Nordic countries,
this conference focuses on the mutual influences of European Avant-garde movements and children's literature in these respective countries.
Moreover, the impact of the European Avant-Garde on Non-European children's literature, for instance in Brazil, Japan or the United States, should be investigated as well.

Chair: Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer (University of Tübingen)
Co-Chairs: Elina Druker (University of Stockholm), Maria Nikolajeva
(University of Cambridge)


Picturing Childhood: A Symposium on Children’s Literature and Psychoanalysis
Deadline:
February 15, 2012

Picturing Childhood: A Symposium on Children’s Literature and Psychoanalysis
Saturday, September 29, 2012
Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania

Featured Author and Illustrator: David Small

David Small is the author of the graphic memoir, Stitches, and the author and illustrator of numerous books for children, including Imogene’s Antlersand Paper John. Winner of the Caldecott Medal in 2001 for “So You Want to be President?,” he and his wife, Sarah Stewart, have collaborated to produce many more award-winning books together, among them: The Friend, The Libraryand The Gardener.

Picture books are for children, or are they? In recent years, the art of telling a story with pictures has crossed over into adult literature in the form of the ‘graphic novel’ and the ‘graphic memoir,’ but the notion that picturing or painting is also narrating, or that in narrating we also picture is not a new one. Freud, in The Interpretation of Dreams, while seeming to privilege the role of language, also paid close attention to the richness of the dream image itself as a depiction of the inner life. Both wish fulfillment and the representation and working through of trauma have their place in dreams and in literature and the visual arts.

This symposium will provide an opportunity for explorations of a variety of themes related to the interplay of words and pictures in children’s literature and literature about childhood: memory, dreams, trauma, creativity, as well as the visual imagining of the child’s body and family are potential topics for discussion. It will provide a forum for papers on David Small’s work in particular and for both the theoretical and clinical aspects of psychoanalysis as they relate to the visual and literary worlds of childhood. Academics, psychoanalysts, graduate students and psychoanalytic candidates are encouraged to submit papers.

Guidelines for submission:

Completed papers only. 8-10pp. No abstracts or proposals.
Names and identifying information on separate cover sheet only.
Deadline: February 15, 2012
Send papers to: Elaine Zickler, PhD at mezickler@gmail.com


Celebrating Childhood Diversity
Deadline:
January 31, 2012

Celebrating Childhood Diversity
9 - 11 July 2012
The University of Sheffield

To celebrate the 10th year of the establishment of the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth at Sheffield University, (CSCY) this conference addresses the theme of diversity in the lives of children and young people.

Issues to be explored include, but are not restricted to:

*Children's and young people's diverse and cultural worlds
*Understanding identity and difference
*Structures and institutions as indices of childhood diversity
*Time, space and place
*Methodological innovations in childhood research
*Theorising similarity and difference


Those wishing to organise small symposia around a specific theme are also invited to submit a proposal.

Abstracts of no more than 200 words (for papers) 400 words (for symposia) should be sent to the conference administrator, Dawn Lessels, by 31st January 2012. Email: d.j.lessels@sheffield.ac.uk.

Information related to this message is available at http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/cscy.


Taking Flight
Ascendio 2012: A Harry Potter Symposium
Deadline:
February 1, 2012

Ascendio 2012: A Harry Potter Symposium welcomes adult scholars and fans of the Harry Potter universe to investigate, deconstruct and unravel the many facets of Harry Potter’s world. We aim to promote scholarly analysis of the books, to provide forums for debate and discussion among fans of those works, and to provide professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and academic scholars.

Our conference theme this year, Taking Flight, echoes the many breathtaking heights and perilous flights throughout the Harry Potter series: we recall Fawkes’s mournful exodus from Hogwarts after the death of Dumbledore; Harry’s sheer joy on his wild dive to catch Neville’s Remembrall; the thrills of Quidditch both on the page and on sporting fields around the world; Harry, Ron and Hermione’s escape from Gringotts on the back of a dragon; and the three “flights” that shaped the life of Sirius Black, among many other gravity-defying moments.

In addition to submissions related to this year’s theme, proposals are sought for presentations, papers, moderated panels, and workshops on any topic relating to the Harry Potter universe and/or the fan community. Special evening sessions will be scheduled for adult programming, and we encourage proposals for a wide range of adult content. We will consider all submissions, but preference will be given to those papers and topics that were not previously presented to HPEF attendees.

We welcome programming of all shapes and sizes, including:

• panels, roundtable discussions, papers, & presentations

• workshops, including but not limited to crafts, fanart & writing techniques

• fan-created media, including WizardRock, vidding and more

• explorations of book-canon, movie-canon and Pottermore

• discussions of fanfiction and shipping (both het & slash pairings)

• the real-world implications of Harry Potter, and fan culture

Proposals should include a quick summary (50-75 words) for the program and a longer abstract (200-500 words) explaining the content. Please submit proposals in Word, RTF or PDF formats.

To submit your proposal or to learn about the requirements for each type of programming, please visit our website at hp2012.org and click on the Programming link. You may send your proposals through email to formalprogramming@hp2012.org. Submissions are due by February 1st! Participants will be notified of their status by March 15th.

Even the tiny flapping wings of the smallest Cornish Pixie can leave a tornado in its wake. In the world of Harry Potter, flights can take us in and out of danger or bring us soaring in triumph like the Weasley twins on their victory path from Hogwarts.

We welcome flights of fancy--so let your imagination soar!


PLACIM (Platform for a Cultural History of Children's Media)
Deadline:
Feburary 1, 2012

THE MULTIPLE LIFE CYCLES OF CHILDREN'S MEDIA: CHILDHOOD NOSTALGIA IN CONTEMPORARY CONVERGENCE CULTURE

International workshop organized by the Platform for a Cultural History of Children's Media (PLACIM)

Dates: August 31-September 1, 2012
Location: University of Reading, Centre for International Research in Childhood (CIRCL), Reading, UK

Nostalgia has shaped the cultural construction of childhood ever since Romanticism, but it seems to have undergone a significant change in the late twentieth century. Nowadays, childhood is no longer exclusively associated with a pre-lapsarian state of nature that we are irrevocably cut off from as we are socialized into language and culture. Rather than the lost paradise it once was, childhood is increasingly identified with the toys, games, and media products of one's youth. Putting it bluntly, childhood seems to change from a special frame of mind into a specific set of commodities. Through shared practices of cultural remembrance (collectors' communities, fan practices), these commodities are imbued with new symbolic significance. This shift implies that our childhood is not as lost anymore as it used to be within the Romantic paradigm. Not only do the commodities of childhood remain accessible as collectors' items, but commercial companies also stimulate the nostalgia fo
r childhood by reissuing the books, comic strips, radio and TV programmes, music recordings, films, and toys that used to be sold to previous generations of children and adolescents. This is not just done with a view to attracting new generations of consumers, but also to cater to adults (second-time consumers) who want to recapture the experiences of their youth. This cycle can in principle be repeated again and again.

This international PLACIM workshop wants to analyze and evaluate the renegotiation of childhood nostalgia in contemporary convergence culture. We invite papers on the following topics:

  1. theoretical perspectives on nostalgia:


Conceptual analysis: how can childhood nostalgia best be defined? Should we distinguish between different types, and if so, which ones?


Critique: Is childhood nostalgia necessarily a retrograde, escapist, emotionally immature and politically irresponsible mind-set? Can nostalgia also serve more constructive cultural, social and political purposes?

  1. issues pertaining to the cultural history of childhood and childhood studies: how exactly is the Romantic concept of childhood transformed in contemporary convergence culture? How does contemporary nostalgia impact on the shifting border between childhood and adulthood? To what extent is today's convergence culture really different from early twentieth century or nineteenth century consumption politics pertaining to children's media? Besides historical comparisons, we also invite detailed case studies that trace the multiple life cycles of individual children's media through time.

  1. reception-studies, including ethnographic and sociological inquiries into the users of today's media: what, exactly, motivates contemporary media users to return to the products of their youth? To what extent are the cultural practices that constitute today's media really different from earlier periods? We welcome field work, interviews, and studies of the reviews of recycled children's media products.

  1. nostalgia and remediation: how does nostalgia influence remediations of a given work? Which possibilities and constraints does nostalgia create for remediation? How do nostalgia and the need for innovation interact when childhood commodities are re-issued?

  1. childhood nostalgia, remediation and globalization: contemporary Western societies have all incorporated migrant groups that import their own cultural legacies into their country of destination. To what extent do the cultural contributions of migrants facilitate movements beyond childhood nostalgia and remediation?

  1. metahistorical reflections: what are the implications of the multiple life cycles of children's media for the ways in which we attempt to write the history of childhood? How do they impact on periodization?


This is the second in a series of three international workshops, organized by the Platform for a Cultural History of Children's Media (PLACIM), which is based at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University, The Netherlands and funded by a competitive research grant from the Dutch Science Foundation (NWO). This platform facilitates the exchange between children's literature scholars and media experts.

If you are interested in participating, please send a 300 word abstract and a 300 word CV to: Lies.Wesseling@Maastrichtuniversity.nl, before February 1, 2011. Please relate your problem statement explicitly to one (or more) of the six topics delineated above. We will accommodate up to 20 contributions to this workshop. We work with pre-circulated papers, as we aim to publish an intellectually rigorous volume of essays on contemporary childhood nostalgia. You will receive notice of acceptance before March 1, 2011. Deadline for the first version of your workshop paper: June 1, 2012.



UMass Amherst English Graduate Organization Interdisciplinary Conference
Forces at Play: Bodies, Power, and Spaces
Deadline
: January 24, 2012


Cyber bullying, the male gaze in cinema, SlutWalk in Toronto, the canonization of slave narratives, border rhetoric in the classroom --
issues such as these take up the ways bodies, power, and spaces converge in a re-seeing and re-interpreting of historical and
contemporary social complexities. Investigating this nexus in our discursive and material realities gives us the language for
articulating the machinations of power and space that construct and dismantle singular and collective (im)material bodies.

The English Graduate Organization of the University of Massachusetts Amherst invites submissions to our 2012 graduate interdisciplinary
conference on March 31st 2012. This year's conference will push against standardized and finite notions of body, power, and space to
explore how these three variables act upon each other to produce layered, complex, and radical permutations. We urge submitters to
investigate the systems of regulation and control that maintain power over singular and collective bodies within various spaces. We invite
submissions from a diverse range of disciplines, critical perspectives, and time periods; all three terms need not explicitly be
examined in the project, though the possibility of convergence is an encouraged angle. Projects may include papers and/or panel
presentations, performance pieces, and multi-media approaches on the following topics:

-literary theoretical approaches
-social spaces and institutions
-composition and rhetorical studies
-canonical studies of bodies of literature
-national and communal boundaries (migrant communities, diasporas,
refugee camps)
-(post)colonialism and global studies
-gender and sexuality studies
-animal studies
-childhood studies
-social thought and political economy studies
-media studies and digital spaces
-visual and performing arts
-pop culture/material culture
-emerging creative projects
-disability studies


SUBMISSIONS:
We accept three different types of submissions:

  1. Individual papers/projects: please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words. Include your name,

paper title, institution, and email address.

  1. Panels: please submit a 1000 word proposal for an entire panel of presentations (3-4 presenters). Included in this proposal should be

abstracts of 200-300 words for all presentations, title of the panel, and information for each presenter (name, paper title, institution,
and email address). If you are forming your own panel, you have the option of providing your own chair.

  1. Performances and creative presentations/panels: we welcome submission of creative works, including creative writing, visual art,

and dramatic performance. Please include a brief description of your project, as well as your name, project title, institution, and email
address.
Email submissions to umassengconf@gmail.com no later than January 25th, 2012.


Children's Literature Association 2012


Literary Slipstreams
Deadline: January 15, 2012

39th Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference

Simmons College

June 14–16, 2012

Literary Slipstreams

The 39th Annual Children‘s Literature Association Conference will consider a multiplicity of interpretations of “Literary Slipstreams,” a theme thriving in the present but involved with waking the past. As we enter the second decade of the 21st century, this theme invites participants to think about literature for children and young adults as a literature both of and in transition. Where has the field been? Where is it going? What are the patterns of critical inquiry in the field? How can Bruce Sterling‘s use of the term slipstream to mean a “fiction of strangeness” and “a parody of mainstream” be applied to our understanding of children‘s and young adult literature?

We suggest the topics below but, in the true spirit of slipstream, we welcome other paper and panel topics suggested by the conference theme.

Revisions, re-versions, and retellings

Adaptations

Prequels and sequels

Genre boundaries, genre bending, and genre crossings

Literary heirs and ancestors

Slipstreams of time and time travel

Scholarly authorship as slipstream

Fan fiction

Narrative playfulness

Changing the historical record

Literary conventions

Parodies

Hybridity (in all forms and contexts)

Irreverence in children‘s literature

Inscriptions and re-inscriptions

Machinima

Multimedia projects

Books as moving objects

Emerging scholars and scholarship

We also welcome papers on the work of Karen Hesse, winner of the 2012 Phoenix Award for Letters from Rifka.

Submissions will be accepted between October 15, 2011 and January 15, 2012.

Send 300-500 word paper proposals to Conference Chairs at childrensliterature@simmons.edu


Immigration, Refuge, and Exile in American Children’s Literature
AND
Secrets of American Children’s Literature: Cryptic Nonsense, Symbols,
Allegories, and Cipher.
Deadline: January 15, 2012

Children’s Literature Society of the American Literature Association
Conference May 24-27, 2012
San Francisco, CA

The Children’s Literature Society of the ALA seeks abstracts for two panels
on children’s literature for the American Literature Association Conference
to be held May 24-27, 2012, at Hyatt Regency Hotel in San Francisco,
California

Panel 1:
Immigration, Refuge, and Exile in American Children’s Literature
This panel explores how experiences of immigration, refuge or exile have been
told through American children’s literature. How have these experiences
been passed on through storytelling, folklore, folktales, poetry, picture
books or other forms of children’s literature, such as video games and other
forms of digital media? How has global cultural awareness influenced identity
understanding in children’s and young adult literature? What questions do
these topics lead us to ask about authenticity, relevance, and specificity in
story depiction in literature? What other questions are raised?

Please send panel proposals or paper abstracts (250-500 words) by January 15,
2012 to Linda Salem lsalem@mail.sdsu.edu and Dorothy Clark
dorothy.g.clark@csun.edu
Please include academic rank and affiliation and AV requests

Hard copies can also be sent to
Linda Salem Dorothy G. Clark
Library Dept. of English
San Diego State University California State University, Northridge
5500 Campanile Drive 18111 Nordhoff ST.
San Diego, CA 92182-8050 Northridge, CA 91330-8248




Panel 2:
Secrets of American Children’s Literature: Cryptic Nonsense, Symbols,
Allegories, and Cipher.

Many obscure, enigmatic and buried symbols enrich children’s picture books,
poetry, and fiction. Secrets, nonsense, allegory, symbols, ciphers, dreams,
or “things buried” may be central to a story’s theme or may be hidden in
the text or the book design itself, discovered not only by doing multiple
readings, but also by upside down and forwards and backwards readings. Is
there a special relationship, for instance, between such concepts as
“secrets” and “dream” and children’s literature? Does children’s
and/or young adult literature conceal “secret” knowledge? This panel
invites papers that explore these topics through a variety of critical
theoretical lenses as well as formalistic readings.

Please send panel proposals or paper abstracts (250-500 words) by January 15,
2012 to Dorothy G. Clark Dorothy.g.clark@csun.edu and Linda Salem
lsalem@mail.sdsu.edu

Please include academic rank and affiliation and AV requests

Hard copies can also be sent to

Linda Salem Dorothy G. Clark
Library Dept. of English
San Diego State University California State University, Northridge
5500 Campanile Drive 18111 Nordhoff ST.
San Diego, CA 92182-8050 Northridge, CA 91330-8248


Conference details may be found at the American Literature Association web
site:
http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/english/ala2/index.html


The Childhood Project 2nd Global Conference
Deadline: January 13, 2012

2nd Global Conference
The Child: A Persons Project
Saturday 7th July 2012-Monday 9th July 2012
Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

Call for Papers:

After a hiatus of one year, the Childhood Project is returning. This inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary conference project seeks to investigate and explore all aspects of childhood. The period of life prior to adulthood is one of dramatic change and development of physical, intellectual, psychological, and many other types of
characteristics. The nature of childhood and its significance as a separate phase of life, however, is viewed quite differently in different cultures and in different historical eras. This conference will look at all aspects of the experience of childhood as well as the social and cultural perceptions of children and childhood. We encourage submissions on any theme to do with the nature of childhood, including, but not limited to the ones listed below.

  1. Definitions of Childhood

  • How has the concept of childhood developed over time?

  • How is childhood viewed differently across different cultures and

eras?

  • What are the boundaries of childhood? (Are children made to grow

up too fast? Are mature people infantilized by definitions of the
boundaries of childhood?)

  • Is “childhood” a singular category or is it composed of quite

distinct multiple categories? How does defining childhood also define
adulthood and vice versa?

  1. Childhood and Development

  • What are the important aspects of physical, psychological,

emotional, intellectual, moral, social, etc. development in childhood?

  • How do institutions (like schools, medical centres, and even legal

systems) effectively nurture the unique developmental needs of
children?

  • How has our understanding of childhood as a period of development

changed over time? Are there ways we are still getting it
significantly wrong?

  1. Children and Relationships

  • What are the dynamics of children’s relationships with their

family, peers, and their community?

  • How are children’s social relationships either experienced

positively or negatively?

  • What are the dynamics of children’s relationships with social

institutions (like schools and religious organizations)?

  • What is the nature of children’s relationships with animals and

nature?

  1. Perceptions and Depictions of Childhood

  • How do adults perceive children and childhood?

  • How do they perceive the capabilities, responsibilities, and

privileges of childhood?

  • How do they perceive their own experiences of childhood? (With

nostalgia? embarrassment? amusement?)

  • How do children perceive themselves?

  • How are children and childhood depicted in academia and in the

media such as art, literature, film, television, advertising, etc.?

  1. Other Issues of Childhood

  • Children and education: What issues are the concerning how children are educated?

  • Children and leisure: How is involvement in recreational activities (including sports) either beneficial or harmful to

children?

  • Children and the law: Does the criminal justice system effectively deal with children both as victims of crime and as perpetrators of

crime?

  • Children and rights: What rights do children have in virtue of being children? To what extent must the choices of children be

respected?

  • Children and gender: How are children socialized into gender-specific roles? What are the issues and concerns connected to

how children form gender and sexual identities?

  • What is the nature of children’s relationship to the world of work?

  • Childhood in transition: how does adolescence bridge the child/adult world and to what extent are adolescents caught in a double-bind of being children and being adults?


The Steering Group welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals. 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 13th January 2012. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 11th May 2012.

300 word abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word, WordPerfect, or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation, c) email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 key words

E-mails should be entitled: CHILD2 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). Please note that a Book of Abstracts is planned for the end of the year. All accepted abstracts will be included in this publication. We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.


Joint Organising Chairs:

Wendy Turgeon
Project Leader
St. Joseph’s College,
New York,
USA
Email: turgeon@optonline.net


Rob Fisher
Network Founder and Leader
Inter-Disciplinary.Net
Freeland, Oxfordshire,
United Kingdom
Email: child2@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Probing the Boundaries programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting.

All papers accepted for and presented at this conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers maybe invited for development for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s)

For further details of the project, please visit:

http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/persons/childhood/

For further details of the conference, please
visit:http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/probing-the-boundaries/persons/childhood/call-for-papers/

Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.


"After Girl Power: What's Next?" Girls' Studies Conference
Deadline: January 10, 2012

"After Girl Power: What's Next?" Girls' Studies Conference
February 24-25, 2012
Berick Saul Humanities Research Centre
University of York
UK

Hosted by:
Centre for Women's Studies
http://www.york.ac.uk/inst/cws/

Contact: Dr. Melinda Luisa de Jesus
Visiting/Fulbright Scholar, Centre for Women's Studies
mdejesus@cca.edumelinda.dejesus@york.ac.uk
Proposal deadline: January 10, 2012


Almost twenty years have passed since The Spice Girls popularized the term "girl power". In this time period have the lives of girls around the world changed for the better?

Since the mid-1990s Girls' Studies has rapidly developed into a distinctive and important field within Women's Studies. Mary Celeste Kearney and Marnina Gonick et al's recent assessments of the discipline identify two major theoretical challenges Girls' Studies must confront in the 21st century: 1) the impact of globalization and neo-liberalist and post-feminist discourse on girls, girlhood and girl cultures; and 2) the urgent need for more work by and about minority girls/girls of color.

Informed by these concerns, After Girl Power: What's Next? will explore the state of global girlhoods and the state of Girls' Studies itself as an evolving discipline. We envision the conference as a way to raise awareness about Girls' Studies and girls' issues in general, and as a crucial space to bring together Girls' Studies scholars, students, advocates for girls/youth, and local girls to encourage dialogue, networking and joint projects.

We seek proposals for presentations and roundtables that emphasize racial/ethnic diversity and collaborative work between girls and researchers. Moreover, beyond a traditional research conference format of panel presentations, we envision "After Girl Power" as encouraging collaborative, creative presentations about girl cultures and concerns, and girl-centric activism. We seek girl-centered performances, films, and art, as well as roundtable and/or poster sessions highlighting the work of schools and girls' organizations.

*Proposals should include a 250 word brief abstract or description outlining the presentation, and should include the names and contact info of all presenters. Please specify any digital media needs (powerpoint, projector, etc) and we will do our best to accommodate. *


Conference keynote speakers include:
- Dr. Rozena Maart, Chair of Gender Studies, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa, and a Center for Women's Studies alumna. Scholar/writer/activist Maart is the author of the award-winning novels Rosa's District 6 and The Writing Circle.


Suggested topics include:

Fourth wave feminisms
Resistance and agency
Girlhood and history
Sex education and information access
Youth cultures
Girlhood and Media
Body image
Sexuality
Education
Relational aggression
Global sisterhoods
Commercialization of girlhood
Young adult literature and children's literature
Girls responding to popular culture
Girls and the arts
Girls and sports
Girls and digital media and social networking
Girls and politics
Girls and activism
Girls and religion and spirituality
Girls and gangs


More information will be forthcoming regarding conference registration fees, housing, travel, program through the conference website:
http://aftergirlpower2012.tumblr.com/

Questions? Please contact Melinda de Jesus: mdejesus@cca.edu.


Children's Literature Association 2012: Diversity Panel
Deadline: December 15, 2011

“The State of Scholarship on Diversity in Children’s and Young Adult Literature”

As U. S. society has grown more diverse, Americans’ responses to differences in ethnicity, race, religion, sexual orientation, and physical and cognitive ability still range from respect and understanding to mistrust and fear. In various ways, writers of children’s and young adult literature have confronted this divide, interrogating the nature of personal and group identities, the composition of “America,” and the most salient ways to represent cultural nuance.

For this panel, we invite papers that explore patterns or theorize problems in the production or reception of children’s and YA literature about diversity. This might entail considering contexts (e.g., aesthetic, political, disciplinary) that inform such literature or the scholarship about it. Other directions include exploring the cross-fertilization between children’s and YA literature and such genre as drama, film, or new media, and examining how the literature is marketed. We are less interested in papers about a single text or case than in larger patterns in the development, production, dissemination, reception, or conceptualization of diversity in children’s and young adult literature.

If you have questions, please contact the chair, Karen Chandler (karen.chandler@louisville.edu). Email your 500-word abstract and 2-page CV by 15 Dec 2011, attaching your abstract in .rtf, .doc, or .docx format, and including your email and phone number.


Popular Culture Association
Education, Teaching, History and Popular Culture Area
Deadline: December 15, 2011

The Area of Education, Teaching, History and Popular Culture is now accepting submissions for the PCA/ACA National Conference, Boston, MA, held April 11 - 14, 2012. The Conference will be held at the Boston Marriott Copley Place (http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/bosco-boston-marriott-copley-place).

Educators, librarians, archivists, scholars, independent researchers and students at all levels are encouraged to apply. Submissions that explore, connect, contrast, or otherwise address area themes of schooling and education, teaching throughout history, and their linkages to popular culture from all periods are desired. Sample topics for papers include, but are not limited to:

--Reflections/linkages between schooling and popular culture in the United States;
--The role of history in education, teaching, or preservice teacher education in the United States;
--The use(s) of popular culture in education, teaching, or preservice teacher education in the United States;
--How education has impacted pop culture/how popular culture has impacted education in the United States;
--Representations of schooling throughout popular culture's history in the United States;
--Cross-border/multinational examinations of popular culture and education;
--The impact/emergence of LGBTQ studies in schooling and education;
--Tapping into pop culture technology to improve instruction;
--Multidisciplinary analyses of the interactions of schooling and popular culture.

Deadline for proposals is December 15, 2011. To be considered, interested individuals should please prepare an abstract of between 100-250 words and submit electronically by visiting http://pcaaca.org/conference/proposing_presentation.php.

While electronic submission to the conference website is preferred, proposals (abstracts with 1-page vitae) may also be submitted directly to:

Dr. Edward Janak
Dept. 3374
College of Education
University of Wyoming
Laramie, WY 82071
ejanak@uwyo.edu

Decisions will be communicated within approximately two weeks of deadline. All presenters must be members of the American Culture Association or the Popular Culture Association by the time of the conference. For additional information about the conference, please visit the PCA/ACA website at http://www.pcaaca.org/conference/national.php


2012 National Latino Children's Literature Conference
Deadline: December 15, 2011

The University of Alabama School of Library and Information Studies is pleased to announce the 2012 National Latino Children's Literature Conference to be held in Tuscaloosa, AL on March 29-30,2012. This exclusive conference was created for the purpose of promoting high-quality children's and young adult books about the Latino cultures and to offer a forum for librarians, educators, researchers, and students to openly discuss strategies for meeting the informational, educational, and literacy needs of Latino children and their families. Featuring nationally-acclaimed Latino literacy scholars and award-winning Latino authors and illustrators of children's and young adult books, this exclusive conference is truly an unforgettable experience.

Request for Proposals: In keeping with the recurring conference theme "Connecting Cultures & Celebrating Cuentos," we invite poster and program proposals that contribute to and extend existing knowledge in the following areas: Latino children's and young adult literature, bilingual education, Latino family involvement in the school curriculum, Latino cultural literacy, library services to Latino children and their families, literacy programs utilizing Latino children's literature, educational needs of Latino children, educational opportunities and collaborations with El dia de los ninos/El dia de los libros (Children's Day/Book Day), Latino children's responses to culturally-responsive literature, social influences of children's media on Latino youth, Noche de Cuentos literacy programs in schools and libraries, and other related topics. Presentations and posters can share recent research or provide practical suggestions for current or preservice librarians and educators. The National Latino Children's Literature Conference is both a research and practitioner conference.

Program Proposals: Programs can be a presentation of research or practical suggestions for teachers, librarians, and other educators. To submit your program proposal, please provide the following information: a 250 word (maximum) abstract of your presentation along with the program title; the name of the program organizer; the names of all presenters and their affiliations along with their preferred contact phone, email, and address; and your preferred presentation day (Thursday, Friday, or Either) to conference chair Dr. Jamie Campbell Naidoo at celebratingcuentos@gmail.com . Please be sure to put "program proposal" in your subject heading.

Poster Proposals: Posters can be a presentation of research or practical suggestions for teachers, librarians, and other educators. To submit your poster proposal, please provide the following information: the title of your poster; a 200 word (maximum) abstract of your poster; the subject of your poster (choose Literature/Media Studies, Programs & Services in Libraries, Educational & Literacy Strategies, or Exemplary Programs); your name and affiliation; your preferred contact phone, email, and address; and your preferred presentation day (Thursday, Friday, or Either) to conference chair Dr. Jamie Campbell Naidoo at celebratingcuentos@gmail.com . Please be sure to put "poster proposal" in your subject heading. Easels will be provided for posters and additional information about poster size will be provided with the acceptance letters.

The deadline for proposal submissions is midnight December 15th, 2011 with notification of acceptance on or before January 9th, 2012. Registration for the conference begins December 1, 2011. Please visit the conference website ( http://www.latinochildlitconf.org/) for information about the past conference and a tentative schedule for the 2012 Conference. The website will be updated soon with information on the author keynotes.

We look forward to receiving your proposals and seeing you in March at our Celebration of Latino Children's Literature!


Need more information on the conference? Contact Conference Chair Jamie Naidoo at jcnaidoo@slis.ua.edu or
205-348-4610



Visions and Voices of Childhood: A Graduate Student Conference
Deadline: December 15, 2011

Department of Childhood Studies
Rutgers University - Camden

The Rutgers University-Camden Childhood Studies Graduate Student Organization (GSO) invites submissions for paper presentations for its second formal graduate student conference to be held May 21-22, 2012 on the Camden, NJ campus. Graduate students from all disciplines who are engaged in research relating to children and childhood are encouraged to submit proposals.

As the field of childhood studies continues to grow, old and new debates and concepts continuously impact the study of children and childhood. Representations and interpretations of children's lives and perspectives have become central to these debates. This conference proposes an open, broad definition of children's visions and voices. Both the theoretical debates surrounding visions and voices and the application of such concepts are encouraged.

Topics can include, but are not limited to:
- Representations of children across all media (literature, film,
television, internet, etc.)
- The theoretical concept of “the child’s voice” in qualitative and
quantitative research
- Children’s development
- Rights of children
- Globalization and children
- Children's involvement in research
- Ethical and methodological considerations for the child's voice
- Visual literacy and children
- Children and religion
- Statistical representations of children
- Children's health
- Race, class, and gender in the study of children
- Geographies and histories of childhood

We invite proposals from all disciplines: education, literature, economics, psychology,
sociology, anthropology, law, political science, history, public policy, criminology, philosophy, medicine, religion, film studies, cultural studies, and the arts ? as well as multi-disciplinary scholarly work.

SUBMISSION: 250-word abstract plus cover letter with name, current level of graduate study, affiliated university, and email address to
childgso@rutgers.camden.edu . Include the words "conference abstract" in subject line, and include name on the cover letter only.

DEADLINE: December 15, 2011. Accepted presenters will receive notification by February 1, 2012.

Contact Matthew Prickett at prickett@camden.rutgers.edu if you have questions about the conference, or visit http://clam.rutgers.edu/~childgso/conference2012.html

Visit the Department of Childhood Studies here:
http://childhood.camden.rutgers.edu/


Philippine Children’s Literature
Deadline EXTENDED: December 16, 2011

39th Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference

SimmonsCollege, Boston, Massachusetts

June 14-16, 2012

The International Committee of the Children’s Literature Association is planning a special country focus panel on the Philippines, to be presented at the 39th Children’s Literature Association Conference, to be held at Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts from June 14 to 16, 2012. The committee invites paper proposals that focus on any aspect of Philippine children’s literature. Papers may focus on the origins of and/or developments in Philippine children’s texts; issues of regionalism and nationalism; Philippine folklore as children’s texts; Philippine children’s literature in the diaspora; or the state of children’s literature studies in the Philippines. Preference will be given to proposals with the potential to inspire American and international scholars to develop active interest in Philippine children’s literature and to integrate it into their own research.

The authors of two papers selected for the panel to accompany a presentation by a Philippine Distinguished Scholar (invited by the committee) will be awarded a $500 travel grant each. Up to four other proposals may be selected as well, pending the approval of the additional panel by the conference paper selection committee. The papers must be presented in English and must not exceed the twenty-minute reading time. The committee strongly encourages ChLA members and other scholars with an interest in Philippine children’s literature to submit paper proposals for the session. Send 500-word abstracts accompanied by up to 250-word bios to the International Committee, Children’s Literature Association, P.O. Box 138, Battle Creek, MI 49016-0138, USA; fax +269-965-3568; or electronically to info@childlitassn.org .

The deadline for submissions has been extended until December 16, 2011.


Game Studies, Culture, Play, and Practice Area
33rd Annual SW/TX PCA/ACA Conference
Deadline: December 2, 2011

Game Studies, Culture, Play, and Practice Area
33rd Annual SW/TX PCA/ACA Conference
February 8-11, 2012
Albuquerque, NM

The Game Studies, Culture, Play, and Practice Area welcomes paper, panel, and other proposals on games (digital and otherwise) and their
study and development.

Possible topics include (but are in no way limited to):

Alternative reality games
Archiving and artifactual preservation
Competitive/clan gaming
Design and development
Economic and industrial histories and studies
Educational games and their pedagogies
Foreign language games and culture
Advertising (both in-game and out)
Game art/game-based art
Haptics and interface studies
Localization
Machinima
MOGs, MMOGs, and other forms of online/networked gaming
Performance
Pornographic games
Religion and games
Representations of race and gender
Representations of space and place
The rhetoric of games and game systems
Serious games
Strategy games
Table-top games and gaming
Technological, aesthetic, economic, and ideological convergence
Theories of play
Wireless and mobile gaming

For paper proposals: Please submit a 250 word abstract and biographical note about your connection to the topic to conference
event management site at http://conference2012.swtxpca.org/. Make sure to select the Game Studies, Culture, Play, and Practice topic area.

For panel and other proposals: Feel free to query first (jruggill@asu.edu). Panel and other proposals should also be submitted to the conference event management site and include the information requested for individual paper proposals, as well as a 100-word statement of the panel's raison d'etre and any noteworthy organizational features.

As always, proposals are welcome from any and all scholars (including graduate students, independent scholars, and tenured, tenure-track,
and emeritus faculty) and practitioners (developers, artists, archivists, and so forth). Also, unusual formats, technologies, and the like are encouraged.

The submission deadline is 12/1/2011.

The Game Studies, Culture, Play, and Practice Area is international in scope and emphasizes diversity, an openness to innovative approaches
and presentations, and the energetic practice of post-conference collaboration and publication.

Judd Ruggill, Area Chair
Game Studies, Culture, Play, and Practice
jruggill@asu.eduhttp://www.swtxpca.org


Celebrating Food and Culture(s) in a Global Context
Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference
Deadline: December 1, 2011

Call for Papers: Children’s/Young Adult Literature and Culture Area

Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference
February 8 – 11, 2012
Albuquerque, NM
http://www.swtxpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: December 1, 2011

Conference hotel:
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
300 Tijeras Avenue NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Further conference details are available at http://www.swtxpca.org

Panels are now being formed in the Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture area. Scholars, researchers, professionals, teachers, graduate students and others interested in this area are encouraged to submit an abstract. Graduate students are especially encouraged and will be assisted in accessing any and all award opportunities the conference and/or associations provide.

This area covers a wide variety of possible mediums: traditional book/literature culture, but also comics, graphic novels, film, television, music, video games, toys, internet environment, fan fiction, advertising, marketing tie-ins to books and films, just to name a few. Proposals on fiction, non-fiction, poetry, or cross-genre topics are welcome. Interdisciplinary approaches are especially welcome, as are presentations that go beyond the traditional scholarly paper format.

The conference theme this year is Celebrating Food and Culture(s) in a Global Context. Proposals addressing this theme in some fashion will be read with special interest.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Food and/or hunger as metaphor in Children’s and YA literature/culture
Gender portrayals
Racial and Ethnic portrayals
Use of innovative or “novel” formats for both children’s and YA literature
The next “big” thing in children’s and YA literature
Film adaptation issues
Historical approaches to children’s and YA literature and culture
New readings of children’s and YA literature and culture
Re-imaginings of myth, fairy tale, and other traditional stories
Explorations of certain authors in the children’s and YA areas
Fan fiction and fan followings of books, films, and authors

Other topics related to Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture will be read with interest.

Please submit proposals of 250 words and a brief bio (100 words) for individual presentations or 500 words for full panels (3-4 people on a panel – please submit contact and brief bio for each person on the panel) to our conference database at http://conference2012.swtxpca.org/. All presenters will have to submit their information to the database eventually, and this makes it easier to organize panels and send acknowledgements and acceptances.

Proposal submission deadline: December 1, 2011.

All accepted presenters will have to register for the conference by December 31, 2011.

For questions or if you encounter problems with submitting proposals to the database, please contact:


Diana Dominguez
Area Chair: Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Culture
gypsyscholar@rgv.rr.com
The University of Texas at Brownsville

Please visit the Conference website for information on registration, accommodations, transportation options, graduate student paper awards, and audio-visual arrangements.

http://www.swtxpca.org


Southwest Texas Popular Culture Association Conference: Children's Film Area
Deadline: November 15, 2011

Proposals are now being accepted for the Children in Film Area of the 33rd annual SWTX PCA/ACA conference February 8-11, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.(www.swtxpca.org). Proposals are welcome that explore and interrogate the representations of children in Hollywood film, independent film, foreign film, and/or children's film. Additional topics of interest concerning children in film or images of children in film may include, but are not limited to: coming-of-age; children of color; negotiations of racial/ethnic/cultural differences; negotiations by children of social, political, economic conditions; children's relationships with adults, parents, siblings, or peers as represented in film; gender and children; sexuality and children; children of the Diaspora as portrayed in film; children and technology; the child body; ideology and the child; children's education, and any other topic that explores the child image in film.

Panel suggestions are welcome!

Deadline for submissions is November 15, 2011. Graduate students are welcome to submit.
Abstracts of 200-300 words should submitted to
http://conference2012.swtxpca.org, or debbieo@okstate.edu, or to the address below. Inquiries and panel suggestions are welcome via email. Please include full contact information--including affiliation, and a brief, 50 word biography with your abstract submission.


Troubling Normativity: Race/Whiteness in the Popular Cultures Of Young People
ARCYP and ACCUTE
Deadline: November 15, 2011

Troubling Normativity: Race/Whiteness in the Popular Cultures Of Young People
A Joint Session of ARCYP and ACCUTE at
The Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Waterloo and Wilfred Laurier University
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

May 28-31, 2012


This panel invites papers that use race/whiteness as a framing or entry point for critical inquiries into popular culture produced for, about, or by young people. How are systems of racialization, whiteness, and normativity produced and consumed, secured and maintained, or contested and countered? Do contemporary cultural industries affiliated with young people's texts and cultures (television, music, film, video games, publishing, theatre, etc.) challenge what Stuart Hall has famously characterized as "racialised regimes of representation" (1997) and the naturalization of racial hegemony? How does race become meaningful in
relation to multicultural clichés of diversity and harmony? How does race function as co-constituent with class, sexuality, and gender?

Possible topics with a focus on race/whiteness in popular culture produced for, about, or by young people might include (but are not limited to) the following:

• popular music (K'naan, Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, etc.);

• popular film (Shrek, The Princess and the Frog, etc.);

• video games (Grand Theft Auto, Final Fantasy, etc.);

• "tween" culture (the Obama girls, Hello Kitty, etc.);

• television (Dora the Explorer, Sesame Street, etc.);

• literature (The Hunger Games, Twilight, etc.).

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html , send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word bio-bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email
addressed to
admin@arcyp.ca by November 15 2011.

NOTE: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.


Youth, (Imaginary) Borders, and the Nation State
ARCYP and ACCUTE
Deadline: November 15, 2011

Youth, (Imaginary) Borders, and the Nation State
A Joint Session of ARCYP and ACCUTE at
The Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Waterloo and Wilfred Laurier University
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

May 28-31, 2012


The nation is a fractured space today, constituted with various institutional and imaginary boundaries that shape experiences of belonging, identity, and childhood. Some boundaries are geographic, such as the borders between the Canadian provinces or between neighbouring countries. Some are related to language -- for instance, the boundary between the "two solitudes" in Canada-- or relate to the passage of time -- for instance, the boundaries between childhood, adolescence and adulthood. These boundaries may be defined as limits never or hardly ever crossed, or as opportunities for youth to grow and mature. Given this, we invite papers that explore and complicate the relationship of youth to imaginary boundaries.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

• young adult and children's literature in translation and the process of
translating;

• young adult bilingual/ multilingual literature;

• (imaginary) borders and young people's electronic and digitally
mediated texts;

• young people's experiences in other countries or provinces, and
volunteering abroad;

• bilingual and multilingual youth experience.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html ,
send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, anda 100-word abstract and 50-word bio bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email addressed to
admin@arcyp.ca by November 15 2011.

NOTE: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general "pool" of ACCUTE submissions.



Youth Creators, Thinkers, and Expressions of “Child Consciousness”
ARCYP and ACCUTE
Deadline: November 15, 2011

Youth Creators, Thinkers, and Expressions of “Child Consciousness”
A Joint Session of ARCYP and ACCUTE at
The Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Waterloo and Wilfred Laurier University
Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

May 28-31, 2012



For Merleau-Ponty, the danger of “dogmatic rationalism” in psychological models of development is the creation of a false dichotomy between two “impermeable” mentalities—that of the child and that of the adult—a hierarchy that fixes “adult” experience within concepts such as the “representation of the world” and “renders communication between the adult and the child theoretically impossible.” These quagmires are vindicated for Merleau-Ponty by the “extraordinary anticipations of
the child’s thought.” We invite papers that analyze various examples of child and youth creative and philosophical consciousness and cultural production. How do young creators and thinkers disrupt the notion that the products of their thought are defined as extraordinary for what they “anticipate” rather than for what they “are”? How do they make permeable the division between adult and child/ youth experiences, “representations of the world,” and effective knowledge?

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

• young people as creators of culture and cultural expression;

• young people as co-creators or collaborators;

• young people as scholars, philosophers, theorists;

• young people’s writing, visual art, film;

• youth and digital media, such as YouTube, blogs, fan fiction, etc.;

• the material conditions, dissemination, and transmission of youth
cultural and philosophical thought and expression.

Following the instructions under Option # 1 at www.accute.ca/generalcall.html , send your 700-word proposal (or 8-10 page double-spaced paper), a Proposal Submissions Information Sheet, and a 100-word abstract and 50-word bio-bibliographical statement, as three attachments to an email
addressed to
admin@arcyp.ca by November 15 2011.

NOTE: You must be a current member of ARCYP or ACCUTE to submit to this session. Rejected submissions will not be moved into the general “pool” of ACCUTE submissions.


Children’s Literature and Imaginative Geography Past, Present, and Future
Deadline: November 15, 2011

Department of English, University of Ottawa

Oct 12-13, 2012

For Tolkien, the Realm of Faerie defined an imaginative place. That sense of place not only defined fairy tales for him; it made the magic of fairy tales possible. It was at the beginning, at the root of fairy tales. Story begins in a place. An imaginative place is also the backdrop of a children’s novel, poem, or play; it IS the world of Story. Whether realistic, fantastic, historical, gothic, or nonsensical, a work of fiction has its own geography. The giant sequoia on a prehistoric island opens Kenneth Oppel’s Darkwing, and defines the soon to be destroyed safety of its colony of chiropters, Oppel’s imagined prehistoric bats. The North shapes the adventures and redemption of protagonist Burl Crow in Tim Wynne-Jones’s The Maestro. P.E.I. inspires and nurtures Anne of Green Gables; her own imagination grows out of her love of the Island. Fantastic geographies, whether in the past or present, can be small or epic in scope: Lilliput or Middle-earth, the Hundred Acre Wood or Narnia, the house of the Other Mother in Coraline or the dark multitudinous worlds of the Inkheart trilogy to name a few.

Cyberspace cannot be mapped like a place on Earth, but it plays a role in present day imaginative geography. It is a place of websites, blogs, e-mails, and tweets, and enables the downloading of books, as well as the creation of interactive fictional worlds. Computers, cell phones, e-readers, and tablets connect us to imaginary places. Cyberspace has also helped make our world into a global village, where it is not so strange to read children’s literature from around the world, whether about the Australian Outback, Nazi Germany, India, or the thick woods of early Canada.

The imaginative geography of children’s literature is the focus of this conference. Where has it been? Where is it now? Where is it going?

Among the keynote speakers are Kenneth Oppel, Alan Cumyn, and Margot Hillel.

Please send electronic or paper proposals by Nov. 15, 2011 to
Aïda Hudson ahudson@uOttawa.ca or Amy Einarsson aeina018@uOttawa.ca
Department of English,
University of Ottawa
70 Laurier Ave. East, Ottawa
ON K1N 6N5


Sixteenth Biennial Conference on Literature and Hawai i's Children
Deadline: November 5, 2011

Sixteenth Biennial Conference on Literature and Hawai i's Children
June 21-23, 2012, Honolulu, Hawaii
Conference Theme: Beyond the Moon: Where Pictures Speak and Stories Paint



Keynote Speakers: Pam Muñoz Ryan, author of The Dreamer, Pura Belpre Award
Grace Lin, author/illustrator Where the Mountain Meets the Moon, Newbery Honor Book


Call for Session Proposals: Due November 5, 2011
Interpreting Literature Strand proposals to Rachel Wolf, rwolf@hawaii.edu
Using Literature Strand proposals to Vicky Dworkin, vicky.dworkin@gmail.com
Creating Literature Strand proposals to Sue Cowing, niuiki@hawaiiantel.net


The Biennial Conference on Literature and Hawai`i's Children, scheduled for June 21-23, 2012 is again calling for session proposals. Sessions are 75 minutes long. A session may consist of an individual presenter or be shared by a panel. The conference seeks to bring together academics, teachers, librarians, writers and would-be writers, illustrators and would-be illustrators, storytellers, parents, grandparents, teens, and children, all people with an interest in children's literature. As such, unlike most academic conferences, we expect all sessions to allow for audience participation, during or after your talk. You must present your session interactively, not simply read a paper. Sessions are free to attendees, except for professional sessions offered by the keynote speakers, for which we charge a small fee.


The conference is made up of three strands, "Interpreting Literature," "Using Literature," and "Creating Literature," in addition to a Teen Track for teenage writers and illustrators and a program of children’s activities. Teen track participants are encouraged to attend any sessions that appeal to them, in addition to a focused session with the keynote author or illustrator.


The "Interpreting" strand emphasizes different ways of reading children’s literature, primarily from a humanities? perspective. We are looking for people, mostly with an academic background (including graduate students), who can do a good job "translating" their specialist knowledge into a form suitable for a general audience. "Using" sessions approach literature from the perspective of teachers, librarians or parents, focusing on innovative ways to work with children’s books directly with children; "Creating" sessions usually come from authors, illustrators, or editors. Participants attend sessions across strands according to personal interest, so audiences are likely to be mixed.


There is no specific form to use for proposals. Please include session title, description (50-150 words), your name, affiliation, and contact information (e-mail, snail mail, phone, and fax). Proposals should be brief, a half-page to a page. You may attach a vita if you wish.


You may see information on the 2010 conference, including session descriptions and the Humanities Guide distributed to each attendee, at http://www.childrensliteraturehawaii.org. This will give an idea of the scope and organization of the conference. Preliminary information on the upcoming conference will be available shortly.


Presenters are responsible for their own travel and housing arrangements.


ICFA 2012: The Monstrous Fantastic
Deadline: October 31, 2011

The Children’s and Young Adult Literature and Art Division
International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts 2012:
The Monstrous Fantastic

In his seminal article on Beowulf, J.R.R. Tolkien describes the three monsters of the poem as “essential, fundamentally allied to the underlying ideas of the poem.” The Fantastic has many similarly integral monsters and monstrosities. But what do these monsters mean? How does the monstrous signify? The Monstrous Fantastic will explore the many creative and cultural constructions of monstrosity in the arts from monsters of ancient times to monsters of the present and future.

This year’s conference will feature Guest of Honor China Miéville, author of many award-winning novels including the Bas-Lag trilogy and, most recently, Embassytown; Guest Author Kelly Link, whose short story collections include Pretty Monsters; and Guest Scholar Jeffrey J. Cohen, editor of Monster Theory and author of Hybridity, Identity and Monstrosity in Medieval Britain, among other works.

The Children’s and Young Adult Literature andArt division welcomes paper proposals on all aspects of the fantastic aimed at younger readers, including picture books, middle-grade and young adult texts, and graphic novels, and especially encourages papers on the work of our special guests and attending authors. Please see our website at www.iafa.orgfor information about how to proposal panel sessions or participate in creative programming at the conference.

Paper proposals must consist of a 300-word abstract accompanied by an appropriate list of referencesto the Children’s and Young Adult division head, Alaine Martaus, at . The deadline for submissions is October 31, 2011. Participants will be notified by November 15, 2011 if they are accepted to the conference. Attendees may present only one paper at the conference and should not submit to multiple divisions.


Children's and Adolescent Literature at CEA 2012
Deadline: November 1, 2011


March 29-31, 2012 | Richmond, Virginia

Omni Richmond Hotel, 100 South 12th
Street, Richmond, Virginia
(804) 344-7000

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on children's and adolescent literature for our 43rd annual conference. Submit your proposal at http://www.cea-web.org

While I welcome essays pertaining to any area of children's and adolescent literature, I am particularly interested in explorations of "borders" in children's and adolescent literature and culture, including books, films, digital texts, video games, and other media. Topics could include but are not limited to:

• Crossing the border between the readership of children and adults
• Thresholds of development (the process of moving from child to adolescent to adult) and liminal spaces in children's and adolescent literature
• The representation of those who lie outside traditionally constructed borders: nerds (the socially marginalized), juvenile delinquents, "non-traditional" families, and marginalized identities associated with race, ethnicity, sex and gender, religion, and disability
• The representation of those who define traditionally constructed borders
• The immigrant experience
• Marginalized / censored children's and adolescent literature
• The construction of or breaking down of borders across media in children's and adolescent literature and culture

CONFERENCE THEME: BORDERS

CEA welcomes proposals for presentations on the general conference theme, Borders.

Borders, boundaries, margins--what lines provide the perimeters to our profession? What demarcations continue to separate and define English studies in the second decade of the new millennium? When is "crossing a line" a desirable professional/pedagogical stance? How have scholarly fields evolved, dissolved, merged or consolidated in areas that we have traditionally viewed as distinct? Exactly where and how is English expanding and extending its borders?

GENERAL CALL FOR PAPERS

CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature criticism and scholarship, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

SUBMISSION DATES: AUGUST 31-NOVEMBER 1, 2011

For more information on how to submit, please see the full CFP at
http://www.cea-web.org

MEMBERSHIP

All presenters at the 2012 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2012. To join CEA, please go to http://www.cea-web.org

OTHER QUESTIONS? Please email cea.english@gmail.com.


“The Same Text but Different: Variants in Children’s Media”

Children's Literature Symposium: Critical Perspectives on Children's and Young Adult Literature

Deadline: October 15, 2011


“The Same Text but Different: Variants in Children’s Media”
February 3-4, 2012
The University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: October 15, 2011
NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE: November 15, 2011

Conference Website: http://www.ChildrensLiteratureSymposium.org

About the Children’s Literature Symposium
Each year, the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee organizes a symposium centered on issues related to the study of children's and young adult literature. The overarching goal of these symposia is to explore children’s and young adult literature through scholarship, research, and criticism: approaching children’s and young adult literature as genres, as opposed to indications of readership. The Children's Literature Symposium (CLS) provides a program through which participants engage with critical and theoretical perspectives on children's and young adult literature. Through presentations that address contemporary issues and trends affecting children's and young adult literature, media, and culture, the CLS aims to engage professionals from the fields of English, education, and library/media science in scholarly discussions about children’s and young adult literature. Themes selected for CLS conferences both reflect current trends (or currently ignored but potentially significant areas) and work to shape where and how children’s literature studies might most usefully move forward. Undergirding the decision to focus each CLS on a specific topic is a belief in the value of a group of contributors all working in and around similar issues.

2012 CLS Theme
This year, the CLS Steering and Planning Committees invite proposals from scholars, critics, researchers, librarians, educators, children's book authors and illustrators, and graduate students for presentations that address the topic of “variants” in children’s and young adult literature: books with plots built upon folklore or other previously written tales. Interest in variants is hardly new, and ultimately, all texts build upon one another. However, recent increases in the publication of picturebooks, novels, and releases of other media (such as film and video games) with plots or structures that draw on folklore (e.g., Gidwitz’s [2010] A Tale Dark and Grimm, Weston’s [2010] Dust City), the work of authors like William Shakespeare (e.g., Dionne’s [2010] The Total Tragedy of a Girl Named Hamlet, Stone’s [2011] The Romeo and Juliet Code, Ray’s [2011] Falling for Hamlet), Henry James (e.g., Griffin’s [2011] Tighter), or Jules Verne (e.g., Blackwood’s [2010] “sort of sequel,” Around the World in 100 Days), or composers like Vivaldi (e.g., Zalben’s [2011] Four Seasons: A Novel in Four Movements) suggest a renewed cultural fascination with texts that “play” with other texts. In addition, single texts have been adapted across media: Neil Gaiman’s Coraline (2002), for example, has been released as both a 2009 feature film and as a 2008 graphic novel (adapted and illustrated by P. Craig Russell).
Through this year’s symposium, we seek to further discussions and enrich understandings of both historical and contemporary children’s and young adult literature and media that lean on, contradict, or extend other texts’ privileging some at the expense of others. Potential topics include (but are not limited to):


--Literary lore, fractured fairy tales, and the authorial use (and/or abuse) of folklore
--Cultural literacy and cultural capital
--Reinscribing and disrupting media Canons
--Shifting audiences: retellings or the appropriation of children’s texts for adults (or “adult” texts being retold or appropriated by/for children)
--Variants as/in translation
--Fanfiction, slash fiction, and other reader-created retellings
--Re-writing of “mainstream” texts by traditionally marginalized populations (i.e., people of color, queer sexualities)
--Theories of variation in narrative and poetic structures (generally--and in texts for young people explicitly)


We invite abstracts (of approximately 250-500 words) for individual paper presentations or virtual papers treating critical concerns in children’s and young adult literature. While all proposals will be considered, preference will be given to those which focus on most clearly on the conference theme.


Proposals must be submitted electronically to the symposium website, http://www.ChildrensLiteratureSymposium.org on or before October 15, 2011. Proposals will undergo a process of blind review, and presenters will be notified of the results on or before November 15, 2011. Receipt of proposals will be confirmed via email within 24 hours of submission.


Thinking Gender 2012
Deadline: October 17, 2011

UCLA CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF WOMEN announces:
THINKING GENDER 2012
22nd Annual Graduate Student Research Conference


Thinking Gender is a public conference highlighting graduate student research on women, gender and/or sexuality across all disciplines and historical periods. We invite submissions for individual papers or pre-constituted panels on any topic pertaining to women, gender, and/or sexuality. This year, we especially welcome feminist research on: gender roles in relation to marriage, parenting, or being single; critiques of biosciences and biotechnology as they pertain to fertility, sanitation, and/or medical experimentation at a local, national or global level; mobility as duress or success--for example, in relation to migration, immigration, or upward or downward economic mobility; life stage issues, such as aging and girls' studies; and feminist storytelling or research in modes such as oral histories, graphic novels, theater, comedy or other inventive expressions.


CSW accepts submissions for both individual papers and pre-constituted panels from all active graduate students. In order to give everyone an opportunity to present, we do not accept submissions from people who presented at Thinking Gender in the previous year. Also no previously published material is eligible.

Students proposing individual papers are to submit an abstract (250 words), a CV (2 pages maximum), and a brief bibliography (3-5 sources), for consideration. For panels, a 250-word description of the panel topic is required, in addition to the materials that must be provided for individual paper submissions. For a more detailed description of submission guidelines, please visit: http://www.csw.ucla.edu/conferences/thinking-gender/thinking-gender-2012.

Send submissions to: thinkinggender@women.ucla.edu

Deadline for Submissions: Thursday, October 17th, 2011 at 12 noon

Conference to be held on
Friday, February 3, 2012
UCLA Faculty Center

Event is free and open to the public, but please be aware that there will be a $30 registration fee for presenters, to cover the cost of conference materials and lunch at the Faculty Center.

UCLA Center for the Study of Women
1500 Public Affairs Building
Box 957222
Los Angeles, CA 90095-7222
310-825-0590http://www.women.ucla.edu/csw/
Email: thinkinggender@women.ucla.edu


NEMLA: Fixing Foods in Literary Modernity
Deadline: September 30, 2011

Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 15-18, 2012--Rochester, New York

For better and for worse, modernity has surely left its mark on the food we daily eat. Two hundred years ago in 1812, Bryan Donkin purchased from a London broker the patent for canning food items inside tin containers. Within the next decade canned goods were widespread in Britain and France (Robertson 123). One hundred and fifty years ago in the spring of 1862, Louis Pasteur and Claude Bernard’s experiments with heating liquids eventually led to pasteurized drinks—first wine and beer and then, later, milk (Greene, Guzel-Seydim, and Seydim).

This panel explores how literature has addressed the last two hundred years of rapidly modernizing food=97a path involving hybridization, preservation, pasteurization, synthesizing, and genetic manipulation. If Brillat-Savarin’s aphorism is still telling today (“Tell me what you eat, and I shall tell you what you are”), what does literature tell us about the modern alimentary subject consuming and or pondering the foods altered by modernity? Always already integrated into our lives on multiple levels,
food could not be modernized without other far-reaching implications. When
discussing food marked by modernity, what larger social or cultural preoccupations does literature engage? How do different authors, historical periods, literary movements, or genres posit the “the mark of modernity” on food? How might literary explorations of modernity and food inform our own contemporary food concerns?

Please send 300-500 word abstracts and a brief bio to Michael D. Becker,
mdbecker@my.uri.edu with “NeMLA 2012” as the subject. Please include your
name, affiliation, email address, and A/V requirements ($10 fee with registration).
Deadline: September 30, 2011


Approaches to Adventure in the Late 19th Century
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Deadline: September 30, 2011

NEMLA 2012
March 15-18, 2012—Rochester, New York

This panel examines the burgeoning interest in adventure during the years 1880-1901. Joseph A. Kestner in his recent Masculinities in British Adventure Fiction, 1880-1915 has suggested that adventure texts are filled with “codes” such as “rescue, heroism, survival, courage, duty, isolation, voyaging” for audiences to “live up to” (1). Papers that scrutinize late-Victorian literary treatments of these codes, in addition to tropes such as travel, sailing, mountain climbing, and camping are warmly welcomed. What is the cultural or historical significance of this attention to adventure and why should it be celebrated? Why are the codes of adventure important, for both the individual and for the state? How do Victorian authors of adventure texts use their works to problematize empire? Can adventure texts function as pedagogical tools for younger readers, colonial administrators, or emigrants? Do adventure texts function at different levels for colonizing or colonized audiences? How do female authors treat the codes of adventure? And what does this intense engagement with adventure reveal? Please submit 250-500 word abstracts (as an MS Word attachment, please) to Rebekah Greene, Rebekah_greene@my.uri.edu, with NEMLA 2012 as the subject heading.


NeMLA 2012

Between Resistance and Silence: The Making of the Child Murderess in German Literature, Film, and Culture

Deadline: 30 September 2011



43rd Annual Convention
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 15-18, 2012
Rochester, New York
Host Institution: St. John Fisher College

"Between Resistance and Silence: The Making of the Child Murderess in German Literature, Film, and Culture"

This panel investigates the topic of infanticide in German literature, film and culture from Enlightenment to the Present. We seek papers that examine medical, political, social, and judicial discourses that impact the making of the child murderess. Please send 250-300 word abstracts and brief biographical statements with university affiliation as e-mail attachments to Ina Sammler isammler@umd.edu and Alexandra Hagen hagenal@grinnell.edu

Abstract deadline: September 30, 2011

Please include with your abstract on a separate page:
- Name and Affiliation
- E-mail address
- A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration)

Venue:
The 43rd annual convention will be held March 15-18th in Rochester, New York at the Hyatt Regency Hotel downtown, located minutes away from convenient air, bus, and train transportation options for attendees. St. John Fisher College will serve as the host college, and the diverse array of area institutions are coordinating with conference organizers to sponsor various activities, such as celebrated keynote speakers, local events, and fiction readings.

Building upon the excellence of past NeMLA conferences, the association continues to grow as a vibrant community of scholars, thanks to the wide array of intellectual and cultural opportunities at every venue. Compact yet diverse, Rochester also boasts important historical connections; it is the site of the home, publication operations, and orations of Frederick Douglass, where he edited the North Star, as well as his eponymous periodical, and delivered the speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?.” Visitors can explore the houses of abolitionist, suffragette, and reformer Susan B. Anthony and the inventor of devices popularizing photography, George Eastman, as well as shopping and eateries; attendees will also be within reach of the beautiful Finger Lakes region, known for its local wineries.

Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however, panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. http://www.nemla.org/convention/2012/cfp.html http://www.nemla.org/convention/2012/cfp.html


Children's Periodicals and Pedagogy
Deadline: September 30, 2011

43nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 15-18, 2012
Rochester, New York – Hyatt Rochester
Host Institution: St. John Fisher College

Panel Description:

Children’s periodicals published in the US over the last 300 years provide a wealth of textual and visual insight into US culture, pedagogy, and conceptions of childhood. This panel will engage with this under-examined body of texts in their most salient mode: as pedagogy. Children’s magazines have been used as instructional tools with subject matter spanning literacy, manners, morality, crafts, citizenship, “mental hygiene,” and beyond, transmitting enduring lessons in an ephemeral format. By packaging their lessons in an entertaining and disposable blend of fiction, non-fiction, images, activities, games, jokes, and riddles, these magazines can be considered a print medium precursor to “edutainment” or, as the motto of *Highlights for Children* calls it, “Fun with a purpose.” This panel is open to explorations of particular mechanisms, contents, and contexts of periodical pedagogy past and present, including examinations of child-readers’ participation in, subversion against, or re-creation of, that pedagogy.

Possible topics from all disciplines may include:

  • histories or analysis of particular children’s periodicals

  • pedagogies in periodicals (ideological, curricular, religious, etc.)

  • convergences of traditional magazines and digital media

  • pedagogy, periodicals, and power

  • magazines produced by children

  • fiction and poetry in magazines

  • use of periodicals in classrooms

  • transnational periodicals

  • production, distribution, and circulation of pedagogy

  • cross-cultural comparisons of periodical pedagogy

  • marginalia and ephemera

  • pedagogy in the home (or doctor’s office waiting room)

  • periodical pedagogy as pop culture

  • children’s responses to and uses of magazines

Please send 500-word abstracts to Patrick Cox at ptcox@camden.rutgers.edu by Sept 30, 2011.


Colonial Girlhood/Colonial Girls Conference
Deadline: September 15, 2011

Colonial Girlhood/Colonial Girls Conference
13-15 June 2012
The University of Melbourne, Australia



Settler colonies and colonies of occupation, such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, Ireland, South Africa, and the Caribbean, held out the possibility for girls to experience freedom from, and the potential to reconfigure, British norms of femininity. Colonial Girlhood/Colonial Girls seeks to draw together international scholars for a multi-disciplinary examination of how colonial girlhood was constructed, and redefined, in both British and colonial texts and cultures. Since girlhood in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries extends from childhood to the age of marriage, it represents a complex category encompassing various life stages and kinds of femininity, as well as differences based on class and race.

Colonial girls occupy an ambivalent and sometimes contested position in British and settler societies, They are sometimes seen as a destabilizing force that challenges conventional expectations of girls or as a disruption that can, and must, be contained. The emergent writings of British-born settlers about and for girls, which were usually published in England, contribute a further degree of complexity to the developing picture of the colonial girl. These texts both perpetuate and occasionally challenge British imperial and gender ideologies, reflecting loyalties torn between “home” and new dominions.

Across national boundaries, the malleability of colonial girlhoods is evident. In British print culture, Indian girls were often represented as victims of an unenlightened culture that offered poor educational opportunities, and Irish girls were frequently “hot-headed” and untamed. In each national context, the workings of colonialism produced different models of idealised girlhood, from which Indigenous girlhoods were often marginalised.

Crucially, the Empire itself was in a state of dramatic flux across what is often called Britain’s “imperial century.” The Empire grew substantially in size and in population in the nineteenth century and its expansion was integral to eventual movements toward independence for white settler societies. Imaginings of Empire and girlhood are both subject to radical change across the century, and reading the intersections and synergies in these transformations will prove mutually illuminating

Scholars from Art History, English, Cultural Studies, History, Indigenous Studies, Education and cognate fields are invited to submit proposals that engage with any aspect of the intersection of British colonialism and girlhood in the period 1815-1930. Papers may be inspired by, but are certainly not limited to, the following themes:

• colonial girls as representative of British imperial ideals
• tensions between imperial and national/colonial identities
• the circulation of feminine ideals between colonies
• print culture and the development of gendered colonial ideals
• Indigenous girlhoods
• coming of age in the colonies
• colonial life as a threat to girlhood
• girlhoods and evolving nationalisms
• British representations of colonial femininity
• class and labour in the colonies
• the imagined role of colonial girls in the British Empire

Please submit a 250-word abstract and a brief biographical statement to Dr Michelle Smith: msmith@unimelb.edu.auand Dr. Kristine Moruzi: moruzi@ualberta.caby 15 September 2011.


The Mind of the Child in the Eighteenth Century
Deadline: September 15, 2011

Call for Papers for a Session at the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Annual Meeting: The Mind of the Child in the Eighteenth Century

San Antonio, Texas March 22 * 25, 2012
Submission deadline September 15, 2011

“The Mind of the Child in the Eighteenth Century” Patrick C. Fleming, 219 Bryan Hall, English Dept., U. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22903; Tel: (702) 274-7349

This panel hopes to explore intersections between two major emerging fields of eighteenth-century studies: children’s literature and cognitive literary studies.

Papers might address the extent to which pedagogical theorists considered the minds of children; if and how children’s texts envision the material brain; how the emerging field of child psychology shaped literary and cultural notions of childhood; scientific experiments on children; the place of the child’s mind in eighteenth-century poetry; children and the Royal Society; or a range of other topics. Papers with an interdisciplinary focus are especially encouraged.


The Grimm Brothers Today:

Kinder- und Hausmärchen and Its Legacy, 200 Years After

Deadline: September 4, 2011



Since 1812 the Grimm Brothers' Kinder- und Hausmärchen (KHM), translated in dozens of languages and read by children and adults everywhere, became the quintessential book of fairy tales. It also provided an enduring, if controversial, paradigm for folktale studies. As the bicentenary of the publication of KHM approaches, we invite scholars to appraise its significance today. We call for papers on all aspects of the Grimms' tales and their legacy, from a number of distinct perspectives. The symposium comprises the following panels:

Brothers Grimm and their European contemporaries (convened by Sadhana Naithani, Associate Professor, Centre of German Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi);

Fairy tale and genre in a post-Grimm era (convened by Donald Haase, Associate Dean and Professor of German, Wayne State University, Detroit);

Filmic adaptations of the Grimm fairy tales (convened by Jack Zipes, Professor Emeritus of German and Comparative Literature, University of Minnesota);

KHM at the intersection of learned tradition and popular literature, art and folk narrative (convened by Christine Shojaei Kawan, Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen and Arbeitsstelle Enzyklopädie des Märchens);

Metamorphosis as metaphor: Transformative magic in the Grimms' KHM (convened by Maria Tatar, John L. Loeb Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University);

Who owns the fairy tales? Heritage, copyright, and the Grimm legacy (convened by Valdimar Hafstein, Associate Professor of Folkloristics, University of Iceland).

Other panel proposals are welcome. All paper and panel submissions must include a title and an abstract (150 to 200 words). The deadline for panel and paper submissions is September 4, 2011. The acceptance of submissions will be announced by October 31, 2011. We expect to send out a second circular, containing an outline of the program and further details, by December 15, 2011.


updated 1 month ago

But Mary Poppins‘s eyes were fixed upon him, and Michael suddenly discovered that you could not look at Mary Poppins and disobey her. There was something strange and extraordinary about her—something that was frightening and at the same time most exciting. (P. L. Travers, Mary Poppins, 1934) "When you wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what‘s the fist thing you say to yourself?" "What‘s for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?" "I say, I wonder what‘s going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet. Pooh nodded thoughtfully. "It‘s the same thing," he said. (A. A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh, 1926) The first week of August hangs at the very top of summer, he top of the live-long year, like the highest seat of a Ferris wheel when it pauses in its turning. (Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting, 1975) My cousin comes to visit and you know he‘s from the South ‘Cause every word he says just kind of slides out of his mouth I like the way he whistles and I like the way he walks But honey, let me tell you that I LOVE the way he talks (Eloise Greenfield, from "Honey, I Love," Honey, I love and other love poems, 1978) They tell you to do your thing but they don‘t mean it. They don‘t want you to do your thing, not unless it happens to be their thing, too. It‘s a laugh, Goober, a fake. Don‘t disturb the universe, Goober, no matter what the posters say. (Robert Cormier, The Chocolate War, 1974) There is nothing—absolutely nothing—half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. (Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows 1908) "My darling child!... Where in the world did you come from?" "From the Land of Oz," said Dorothy gravely. "And here is Toto, too. And oh, Aunt Em! I‘m so glad to be at home again!" (L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, 1900) It was a dark and stormy night. (Madeleine L‘Engle, A Wrinkle in Time, 1962) When Jamie saw him throw the baby, saw Van throw the little baby, saw Van throw his little sister Nin, when Jamie saw Van throw his baby sister Nin, then they moved. (Carolyn Coman, What Jamie Saw, 1995) Do you understand how amazing it is to hear that from an adult? Do you know how amazing it is to hear that from anybody? It‘s one of the simplest sentences in the world, just four words, but they‘re the four hugest words in the world when they‘re put together. You can do it. (Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, 2007) When beetles fight these battles in a bottle with their paddles and the bottle‘s on a poodle and the poodle‘s eating noodles... (Dr. Seuss, Fox in Socks 1965) Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. They were the last people you‘d expect to be involved in anything strange or mysterious, because they just didn‘t hold with such nonsense. (J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer‘s Stone, 1997) She knew they were all afraid. But love and disease are both like electricity, Weetzie thought. They are always there—you can‘t see or smell or hear, touch, or taste them, but you know they are there like a current in the air. We can choose, Weetzie thought, we can choose to plug into the love current instead. (Francesca Lia Block, Weetzie Bat 1989) "Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything‘s got a moral, if only you can find it." (Lewis Carroll, Alice‘s Adventures in Wonderland 1865) "Yes, it‘s very wicked to lie," said Pippi even more sadly. "But I forget it now and then. And how can you expect a little child whose mother is an angel and whose father is king of a cannibal island and who herself has sailed on the ocean all her life—how can you expect her to tell the truth always?" (Astrid Lindgren, Pippi Longstocking, 1950) TWINKLE, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are ! Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky. (Ann and Jane Taylor, from "The Star," Rhymes from the Nursery, 1806) "Where‘s papa going with that ax?" (E. B. White, Charlotte‘s Web 1952) "You‘ve started quite a career for yourself, Nancy. I wonder if you‘ll have any more adventures?" Nancy gave a tired sigh. "Oh, I think I‘ve had enough to last me for the rest of my life!" But in heart heart, she knew she had not. The love for mystery would always be with her. (Carolyn Keene, The Bungalow Mystery 1930) HOW doth the little busy bee Improve each shining hour, And gather honey all the day From every opening flower! (Isaac Watts, from "Against Idleness and Mischief, Divine Songs for Children, 1715)Take some time daily to speak a little to your children one by one about their miserable condition by nature…. They are not too little to die… not too little to go to hell. — James Janeway, A Token for Children (1671-2) But Mary Poppins‘s eyes were fixed upon him, and Michael suddenly discovered that you could not look at Mary Poppins and disobey her. There was something strange and extraordinary about her—something that was frightening and at the same time most exciting. (P. L. Travers, Mary Poppins, 1934) "When you wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what‘s the fist thing you say to yourself?" "What‘s for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?" "I say, I wonder what‘s going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet. Pooh nodded thoughtfully. "It‘s the same thing," he said. (A. A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh, 1926) The first week of August hangs at the very top of summer, he top of the live-long year, like the highest seat of a Ferris wheel when it pauses in its turning. (Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting, 1975) My cousin comes to visit and you know he‘s from the South ‘Cause every word he says just kind of slides out of his mouth I like the way he whistles and I like the way he walks But honey, let me tell you that I LOVE the way he talks (Eloise Greenfield, from "Honey, I Love," Honey, I love and other love poems, 1978) They tell you to do your thing but they don‘t mean it. They don‘t want you to do your thing, not unless it happens to be their thing, too. It‘s a laugh, Goober, a fake. Don‘t disturb the universe, Goober, no matter what the posters say. (Robert Cormier, The Chocolate War, 1974) There is nothing—absolutely nothing—half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. (Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows 1908) "My darling child!... Where in the world did you come from?" "From the Land of Oz," said Dorothy gravely. "And here is Toto, too. And oh, Aunt Em! I‘m so glad to be at home again!" (L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, 1900) It was a dark and stormy night. (Madeleine L‘Engle, A Wrinkle in Time, 1962) When Jamie saw him throw the baby, saw Van throw the little baby, saw Van throw his little sister Nin, when Jamie saw Van throw his baby sister Nin, then they moved. (Carolyn Coman, What Jamie Saw, 1995) Do you understand how amazing it is to hear that from an adult? Do you know how amazing it is to hear that from anybody? It‘s one of the simplest sentences in the world, just four words, but they‘re the four hugest words in the world when they‘re put together. You can do it. (Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, 2007) When beetles fight these battles in a bottle with their paddles and the bottle‘s on a poodle and the poodle‘s eating noodles... (Dr. Seuss, Fox in Socks 1965) Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. They were the last people you‘d expect to be involved in anything strange or mysterious, because they just didn‘t hold with such nonsense. (J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer‘s Stone, 1997) She knew they were all afraid. But love and disease are both like electricity, Weetzie thought. They are always there—you can‘t see or smell or hear, touch, or taste them, but you know they are there like a current in the air. We can choose, Weetzie thought, we can choose to plug into the love current instead. (Francesca Lia Block, Weetzie Bat 1989) "Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything‘s got a moral, if only you can find it." (Lewis Carroll, Alice‘s Adventures in Wonderland 1865) "Yes, it‘s very wicked to lie," said Pippi even more sadly. "But I forget it now and then. And how can you expect a little child whose mother is an angel and whose father is king of a cannibal island and who herself has sailed on the ocean all her life—how can you expect her to tell the truth always?" (Astrid Lindgren, Pippi Longstocking, 1950) TWINKLE, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are ! Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky. (Ann and Jane Taylor, from "The Star," Rhymes from the Nursery, 1806) "Where‘s papa going with that ax?" (E. B. White, Charlotte‘s Web 1952) "You‘ve started quite a career for yourself, Nancy. I wonder if you‘ll have any more adventures?" Nancy gave a tired sigh. "Oh, I think I‘ve had enough to last me for the rest of my life!" But in heart heart, she knew she had not. The love for mystery would always be with her. (Carolyn Keene, The Bungalow Mystery 1930) HOW doth the little busy bee Improve each shining hour, And gather honey all the day From every opening flower! (Isaac Watts, from "Against Idleness and Mischief, Divine Songs for Children, 1715)Take some time daily to speak a little to your children one by one about their miserable condition by nature…. They are not too little to die… not too little to go to hell. — James Janeway, A Token for Children (1671-2) But Mary Poppins‘s eyes were fixed upon him, and Michael suddenly discovered that you could not look at Mary Poppins and disobey her. There was something strange and extraordinary about her—something that was frightening and at the same time most exciting. (P. L. Travers, Mary Poppins, 1934) "When you wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what‘s the fist thing you say to yourself?" "What‘s for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?" "I say, I wonder what‘s going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet. Pooh nodded thoughtfully. "It‘s the same thing," he said. (A. A. Milne, Winnie-the-Pooh, 1926) The first week of August hangs at the very top of summer, he top of the live-long year, like the highest seat of a Ferris wheel when it pauses in its turning. (Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting, 1975) My cousin comes to visit and you know he‘s from the South ‘Cause every word he says just kind of slides out of his mouth I like the way he whistles and I like the way he walks But honey, let me tell you that I LOVE the way he talks (Eloise Greenfield, from "Honey, I Love," Honey, I love and other love poems, 1978) They tell you to do your thing but they don‘t mean it. They don‘t want you to do your thing, not unless it happens to be their thing, too. It‘s a laugh, Goober, a fake. Don‘t disturb the universe, Goober, no matter what the posters say. (Robert Cormier, The Chocolate War, 1974) There is nothing—absolutely nothing—half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats. (Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows 1908) "My darling child!... Where in the world did you come from?" "From the Land of Oz," said Dorothy gravely. "And here is Toto, too. And oh, Aunt Em! I‘m so glad to be at home again!" (L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, 1900) It was a dark and stormy night. (Madeleine L‘Engle, A Wrinkle in Time, 1962) When Jamie saw him throw the baby, saw Van throw the little baby, saw Van throw his little sister Nin, when Jamie saw Van throw his baby sister Nin, then they moved. (Carolyn Coman, What Jamie Saw, 1995) Do you understand how amazing it is to hear that from an adult? Do you know how amazing it is to hear that from anybody? It‘s one of the simplest sentences in the world, just four words, but they‘re the four hugest words in the world when they‘re put together. You can do it. (Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, 2007) When beetles fight these battles in a bottle with their paddles and the bottle‘s on a poodle and the poodle‘s eating noodles... (Dr. Seuss, Fox in Socks 1965) Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. They were the last people you‘d expect to be involved in anything strange or mysterious, because they just didn‘t hold with such nonsense. (J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer‘s Stone, 1997) She knew they were all afraid. But love and disease are both like electricity, Weetzie thought. They are always there—you can‘t see or smell or hear, touch, or taste them, but you know they are there like a current in the air. We can choose, Weetzie thought, we can choose to plug into the love current instead. (Francesca Lia Block, Weetzie Bat 1989) "Tut, tut, child!" said the Duchess. "Everything‘s got a moral, if only you can find it." (Lewis Carroll, Alice‘s Adventures in Wonderland 1865) "Yes, it‘s very wicked to lie," said Pippi even more sadly. "But I forget it now and then. And how can you expect a little child whose mother is an angel and whose father is king of a cannibal island and who herself has sailed on the ocean all her life—how can you expect her to tell the truth always?" (Astrid Lindgren, Pippi Longstocking, 1950) TWINKLE, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are ! Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky. (Ann and Jane Taylor, from "The Star," Rhymes from the Nursery, 1806) "Where‘s papa going with that ax?" (E. B. White, Charlotte‘s Web 1952) "You‘ve started quite a career for yourself, Nancy. I wonder if you‘ll have any more adventures?" Nancy gave a tired sigh. "Oh, I think I‘ve had enough to last me for the rest of my life!" But in heart heart, she knew she had not. The love for mystery would always be with her. (Carolyn Keene, The Bungalow Mystery 1930) HOW doth the little busy bee Improve each shining hour, And gather honey all the day From every opening flower! (Isaac Watts, from "Against Idleness and Mischief, Divine Songs for Children, 1715)Take some time daily to speak a little to your children one by one about their miserable condition by nature…. They are not too little to die… not too little to go to hell. — James Janeway, A Token for Children (1671-2)